Crimes and Their Punishments – Through the Ages

Punishments for Crimes through the ages – from the bizarre to outrageous, from the sublime to the ridiculous. We don’t know how lucky we are!

Many of us are apt to complain about sentences handed out by our Courts for crimes these days – too harsh, too lenient. But a quick look at some punishments for crimes through the ages, including in some countries today, we should really consider how much we really have to complain about.

Not only have punishments been truly shocking (and in some instances still are), but even some of the crimes are truly unbelievable.

Many Sydney criminal lawyers would have had their work cut out for them if some of these historical crimes were still on the statute books! Lucky for us that our complaints about the justice systems these days are limited to whether an offender should be given a jail sentence or community service, or whether a 2 year sentence is sufficient or whether 5 would have been better, and so on.

Thank goodness we don’t have to contend with crimes for which the penalty is being tortured to death by some truly unimaginable means. Criminal lawyers in Australia, as in Europe, the United States, Canada, New Zealand and others, these days don’t have to plead for the type of mercy that offenders of times gone by had to. And of course, some of these barbaric practices do still exist today in other parts of the globe, as you can see below.

Some Crimes and Some Punishments You Won’t Believe

Take a look …

Crimes and Their Punishments

Judge demands ex-Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn get papers in order, appear in court after request for two-month delay – CNBC

Former White House National Security Advisor Michael Flynn leaves the Prettyman Federal Courthouse following a sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court December 18, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Friday cracked the whip in the criminal case of President Donald Trump‘s first national security advisor Michael Flynn, hours after Flynn’s new lawyer and prosecutors asked the judge to delay setting a new date for his criminal sentencing by at least another 60 days.

Judge Emmet Sullivan ordered Flynn by Monday to tell his new lawyer, the pro-Trump Sidney Powell, to enter an appearance in the case by Monday.

The judge also ordered the Texas-based Powell to comply by that same day with a court rule requiring lawyers not admitted to practice in a District of Columbia court to have a local lawyer participate in a case with them.

Powell had yet filed that paperwork, despite Flynn’s former criminal defense lawyers successfully asking to be removed from the case last week, and despite Powell signing a status report with prosecutors on Friday asking for a delay in the case.

Sullivan pointedly noted in his order that Powell signed that report as “Attorney for the Defendant,” despite not entering a formal appearance in Flynn’s case.

Sullivan also ordered the case’s parties to show up for a status conference in court next Wednesday.

Powell, who has been critical of the prosecution of Flynn, did not return a request for comment from CNBC on Friday.

In the status report filed earlier Friday by prosecutors and Powell asking for the delay in the case, the parties said that the retired Army lieutenant general’s cooperation with prosecutors is largely complete.

But they also noted Flynn may be called by prosecutors testify at the trial of a former lobbying business partners next month.

Those men, Bijan Rafiekian and Kamil Alptekin, have denied charges pending in federal court in Virginia that they unlawfully lobbied on behalf of Turkey.

The filing also suggests that Flynn’s new legal team needs time to familiarize itself with the “voluminous” amount of information in their client’s case.

It was revealed last week that Flynn had fired his previous lawyers.

He since has hired the pro-Trump former federal prosecutor Powell to represent him, along with attorneys from Virginia and Florida.

Those new attorneys have all filed documents in the Virginia federal case indicating their reprsentation of Flynn in the case involving Rafiekian and Alptekin.

But they had not as of Friday afternoon filed similar paperwork in Flynn’s own criminal case, in which he had pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to FBI agents about his conversations with a Russian diplomat in the weeks before Trump took office.

Sullivan was scheduled to sentence Flynn last December.

But that proceeding was suspended after Sullivan suggested to Flynn that he would have a better chance of avoiding any jail time by waiting to be sentenced until after he had finished cooperating.

Former federal prosecutor David Weinstein told CNBC that ot “appears that Flynn is continuing to pursue the path of cooperation,” and that he is “willing and able to testify” at the trial inVirginia.

Weinstein added that it “doesn’t appear, at least not in this filing, that they’d be looking to withdraw [Flynn’s] plea” — a question that arose after Flynn hired Powell, who had previously urged him to withdraw his guilty plea.

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'Criminal Minds' Star: It's Time for the Army to Have Its Own Museum – Military.com

Joe Mantegna, an award-winning actor who currently stars in “Criminal Minds” on CBS, is the national spokesperson for the campaign to build the National Museum of the United States Army (www.ArmyHistory.org).

On a recent trip to Washington, D.C., I joined a preview tour of the National Museum of the United States Army, scheduled to open next year at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. As I approached the main entrance of the massive building encased in steel panels and glass, I walked over a pathway of granite bricks adorned with the names of those who have served. I paused for a moment to run my hand over the one reading, “William J. Novelli, World War II, Chicago, IL.”

William Novelli was my uncle. Drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942, he was offered a deferment that would have allowed him to serve his time at home. He declined. Willie’s older brothers had deployed to Europe, and he wanted to follow them. My uncle served in the Army for three years, and not once did I hear him express regret for his decision to enter combat. Later in life, he shared his war stories, and I am forever grateful that he did.

Surrounding my Uncle Willie’s brick are ones honoring his brothers. Nearby, I spotted some more recognizable names, including fellow World War II veteran, Sen. Bob Dole. However, most of the tributes along the pathway honored people like my uncle, ordinary Americans who once accomplished something extraordinary.

Inside the museum, construction is ongoing, yet some of the largest artifacts are already in place. When our tour passed through the World War II gallery, I could see my uncle’s story coming to life. As we approached a Higgins boat — one of the few remaining that is known to have carried troops ashore at Normandy on D-Day — I thought of how many times my uncle told me what it was like to step foot on those war-torn beaches on the 20th day of the operation. When we walked up to the Sherman “Jumbo” Tank that was the first to break through enemy lines outside the town of Bastogne, I remembered how my Uncle Willie fought valiantly in the Battle of the Bulge despite his shattered knee.

The “Higgins Boat” is moved in the future National Museum of the United States Army, Aug. 8, 2017. (U.S. Army/Michel’le Stokes)

For more than 25 years, I have imitated my Uncle Willie’s distinctive raspy voice when recording the character of Fat Tony on “The Simpsons.” It started as a light-hearted tribute to the uncle who had made such an impact on my life. But as my Uncle Willie grew older, I wanted to preserve not only his voice, but his stories — the ones that so many of his generation once told but are now being lost to time.

The National Museum of the United States Army will be the first museum to tell the history of the U.S. Army in its entirety. Visitors will trace the legacy of those first soldiers who gave our nation the confidence to declare its independence. Artifacts, documents, images and paintings — most never seen by the American public — will tell how our Army evolved from its humble beginnings into the force that made all the difference in two world wars.

My generation will recognize the Huey helicopter already hanging from the museum’s rafters as one of the countless we saw fly past our television screens during the years of the Vietnam War. Many will know exactly what it felt like to be seated in those helicopters as they flew young soldiers to and from jungle battlefields.

Americans will feel the sting of memories stirred by the artifacts from the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The M3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle that led the 2003 charge from Kuwait to Baghdad is already in place to tell the story of the years that followed those attacks. The memories of those initial years of fighting are still fresh though, just like D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge, they will one day be a distant part of our nation’s memory if we carelessly forget them.

In nearly two and a half centuries, 30 million men and women have served as American soldiers. Each of their stories deserves to be told. And we, as grateful Americans, owe it to ourselves to preserve the Army’s history as it is inseparable from our own. The National Museum of the United States Army is being constructed largely with the support of individual Americans. As building continues, that support is still needed.

On June 14, the nation celebrates the Army’s 244th birthday. Let’s make sure that when they blow out their candles next year, they can do so in a magnificent museum, telling the stories of every soldier, past, present and future.

— The opinions expressed in this op-ed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Military.com. If you would like to submit your own commentary, please send your article to opinions@military.com for consideration.

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Robert Corry, lawyer for suspect charged in deadly I-70 crash, arrested in domestic violence case – The Denver Post

The attorney for the truck driver at the center of the deadly crash on Interstate 70 in April has been arrested in a domestic violence case, Denver police said.

Robert Corry, a noted marijuana lawyer and advocate, was arrested Friday on investigation of criminal mischief, first-degree kidnapping, aggravated motor vehicle theft and reckless endangerment, according to Denver County jail records. He remains in jail with no bail, records show, and has not been formally charged.

All the charges are related to an alleged domestic violence incident that occurred Wednesday, police spokesman Kurt Barnes said.

Corry, 51, represents Rogel Lazaro Aguilera-Mederos, the Texas truck driver charged with 36 felonies for crashing his runaway semitrailer into stopped traffic April 25.

Corry, who helped draft Amendment 64 and has argued numerous marijuana cases in the state, previously has been arrested for smoking marijuana during a Rockies game in 2013.

He also was arrested the same year for allegedly smashing the window of a recreational vehicle. Previously, he faced a sexual assault charge in Jefferson County that he later pleaded down to third-degree assault.

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'Criminal Minds' Star Joe Mantegna and His Wife Have Been Through So Much Together – Yahoo Lifestyle

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="From Country Living” data-reactid=”31″>From Country Living

  • Criminal Minds star Joe Mantegna started dating his wife in 1969.
  • The two married in 1975 after exchanging private vows in Paris.
  • They share two children together, Mia, 32, and Gia, 29.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Actor Joe Mantegna is about to embark on his final season with CBS show, Criminal Minds. His character, David Rossi, has been married multiple times and claims a childhood sweetheart was the girl who got away. In real life, Joe has been with his wife, Arlene, for 50 years. And the couple has a beautiful love story in which they have helped each other through hard times and encouraged each other’s dreams.” data-reactid=”36″>Actor Joe Mantegna is about to embark on his final season with CBS show, Criminal Minds. His character, David Rossi, has been married multiple times and claims a childhood sweetheart was the girl who got away. In real life, Joe has been with his wife, Arlene, for 50 years. And the couple has a beautiful love story in which they have helped each other through hard times and encouraged each other’s dreams.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Joe and Arlene are from the Chicago area and they met in high school and began dating in 1969, according to People. They married in 1975, but first they exchanged private, informal vows at the top of the Eiffel Tower.” data-reactid=”37″>Joe and Arlene are from the Chicago area and they met in high school and began dating in 1969, according to People. They married in 1975, but first they exchanged private, informal vows at the top of the Eiffel Tower.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In 1978, they packed a U-Haul and moved to Los Angeles with actor Dennis Franz, who later found success on shows such as Hill Street Blues and NYPD Blue. Joe, however, had a slower start. He finally attracted attention in 1984 after performing in a Broadway play.” data-reactid=”58″>In 1978, they packed a U-Haul and moved to Los Angeles with actor Dennis Franz, who later found success on shows such as Hill Street Blues and NYPD Blue. Joe, however, had a slower start. He finally attracted attention in 1984 after performing in a Broadway play.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Joe returned to the Chicago theatre scene with Arlene at this side. The two cooked pasta dinners for the cast and hosted parties for their theatre friends. “I don’t know how to cook for two,” Arlene told the Chicago Tribune in 1986. “It’s always for eight or ten.”” data-reactid=”59″>Joe returned to the Chicago theatre scene with Arlene at this side. The two cooked pasta dinners for the cast and hosted parties for their theatre friends. “I don’t know how to cook for two,” Arlene told the Chicago Tribune in 1986. “It’s always for eight or ten.”

Arlene supported Joe as he strove to be an actor. During one performance at the famed Goodman Theatre, Joe flubbed his lines and the audience waited awkwardly for the scene to recover. Arlene hugged Joe during intermission and gave encouragement. After the second act, one Chicago critic rated Joe as “brilliant.”

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The couple continued to rely on each other after they welcomed daughter Mia into the world in 1987. Mia, now 32, was born three months early due to an infection in the umbilical cord. She struggled as a baby, and Arlene and Joe confronted terrifying moments in which she stopped breathing altogether. Joe went as far as to change the light bulb on his front porch from white to red so ambulances could find their house easier.At the age of two, Mia was diagnosed with autism.

“You go through a million emotions,” Joe said. “Your heart flies out of your chest.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In 1990, the couple had a second daughter, Gina, now 29, just as Joe began booking more TV and film roles, such as The Godfather III. She and her sister were close from the beginning. “She’s wise beyond her years and really understands Mia," he told People.” data-reactid=”83″>In 1990, the couple had a second daughter, Gina, now 29, just as Joe began booking more TV and film roles, such as The Godfather III. She and her sister were close from the beginning. “She’s wise beyond her years and really understands Mia,” he told People.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Arlene managed the family and supported Joe’s acting career. Then in 2003, Joe supported Arlene’s dream of opening her own restaurant. They created Taste Chicago in Burbank, California, which served Chicago comfort foods such as Italian beef sandwiches, deep dish pizza, and Vienna Beef hotdogs in a poppy seed bun before closing in March 2019.” data-reactid=”86″>Arlene managed the family and supported Joe’s acting career. Then in 2003, Joe supported Arlene’s dream of opening her own restaurant. They created Taste Chicago in Burbank, California, which served Chicago comfort foods such as Italian beef sandwiches, deep dish pizza, and Vienna Beef hotdogs in a poppy seed bun before closing in March 2019.

Photo credit: GettyPhoto credit: Getty
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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Their two daughters are grown, and daughter Gina (who uses the professional name Gia Mantegna) is an actress who appeared on the hit sitcom, The Middle.” data-reactid=”107″>Their two daughters are grown, and daughter Gina (who uses the professional name Gia Mantegna) is an actress who appeared on the hit sitcom, The Middle.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="After 51 year together, the couple is now focused on giving back. Joe is the spokesperson for the National Army Museum, which hopes to build a museum dedicated to the history of military service. Arlene and Joe also support eight charities that serve veterans or individuals with developmental disabilities, such as Autism Speaks.” data-reactid=”108″>After 51 year together, the couple is now focused on giving back. Joe is the spokesperson for the National Army Museum, which hopes to build a museum dedicated to the history of military service. Arlene and Joe also support eight charities that serve veterans or individuals with developmental disabilities, such as Autism Speaks.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Joe recently turned 71 and has no plans to retire. In addition to his acting and philanthropic work, he’s also directing. He has directed episodes of Criminal Minds, and most recently he returned to the theatre by directing the Off Broadway show, I am Lenny Bruce. With Arlene, no doubt, by his side.” data-reactid=”109″>Joe recently turned 71 and has no plans to retire. In addition to his acting and philanthropic work, he’s also directing. He has directed episodes of Criminal Minds, and most recently he returned to the theatre by directing the Off Broadway show, I am Lenny Bruce. With Arlene, no doubt, by his side.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(‘You Might Also Like’,)” data-reactid=”110″>(‘You Might Also Like’,)

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Amanda Knox, Tearful and Angry, Speaks in Italy, Years After Murder Acquittal – The New York Times

MODENA, Italy — When Amanda Knox, the American whose murder trial had riveted the world, landed at Linate Airport in Milan on Thursday, she immediately engaged in a familiar and uneasy tango with the news media.

Straight-faced and stiff-lipped, Ms. Knox dodged flashbulbs as a coterie of bodyguards kept the press at bay. She had returned to Italy to speak about wrongful convictions in her first trip to the country since 2011, when an appeals court in Perugia acquitted her of the murder of her roommate, the British student Meredith Kercher.

But even as Ms. Knox shunned reporters this past week, a videographer on her team was tracking her every move. And on Saturday, when Ms. Knox finally broke a self-imposed three-day silence at the Festival on Criminal Justice in Modena, in central Italy, she wept.

Ms. Knox told the packed audience that she was afraid “that I will be molested, derided, framed, that new accusations will be directed against me for telling my truth.”

“I know that despite my acquittal I remain a controversial figure for the public opinion, especially in Italy,” she added. “I know that many people think I am bad, that I don’t belong here. It shows how a false narrative can be powerful and undermine justice, especially when amplified by the media.”

Ms. Knox had been introduced by Guido Sola, a lawyer and one of the conference organizers, as an example of someone facing trial by news media, a victim of a “mass media lynching” whose guilt had been decided in the court of public opinion long before she appeared in an actual courtroom.

Her trial was a perfect case study for the conference. She had been accused with her Italian boyfriend at the time, Raffaele Sollecito, and an Ivorian-born acquaintance, Rudy Guede, of murdering Ms. Kercher on Nov. 1, 2007. The case ping-ponged around various Italian courts for years, until the country’s highest court definitively acquitted Ms. Knox and Mr. Sollecito in 2015. Mr. Guede is still serving a 16-year sentence.

At times tearful, at times defiant on Saturday, Ms. Knox recounted her odyssey for nearly an hour, occasionally breaking down, such as while recalling an injustice or a kindness received. She blamed the news media, local and international, for not having dug deeper to reveal the flaws in the prosecution’s case — instead, she said, fueling the frenzy with stories about her purportedly salacious past.

“I was never a defendant, innocent until proven guilty,” she said of the public’s perception. “I was sly, a psychopath, dirty, a slut, guilty until proven otherwise.”

This warped version of her entered into the courtroom, compromising the result of the trial, she said.

The most important lesson she had learned, she said, was that it was easy for the public to distort defendants into monsters. “It’s easy to see what we want to see,” Ms. Knox added, reducing criminal cases to “black and white stories populated by demons and saints.”

The three-day festival was organized by Italy’s Innocence Project and the Criminal Bar Association in Modena to discuss “complicated themes” on criminal justice, said Luca Lupária Donati, a law professor at Tre University in Rome and the founder and director of the Italian Innocence Project. Judges and prosecutors were invited to attend.

Mr. Lupária said in an interview in Rome that the issue of wrongful conviction and miscarriages of justice was especially important “in a moment of populism, where the theme of the death penalty was rearing its head in Europe,” where it does not exist.

“It can take 100 to 200 years to achieve some legal rights but a day to lose them,” he said.

Ms. Knox’s case was particularly divisive, stirring passionate debate on her innocence in Italy and the United States. Hordes of news cameras and journalists followed the case as it bounced from court to court. Benedetto Lattanzi and Valentino Maimone, the co-founders of Errorigiudiziari.com, an archive that tracks judicial errors in Italy, said that whenever they posted something about Ms. Knox, she was immediately attacked on social media by Italian haters.

“We’re still stunned that so many years later there’s still this hatred, this loathing,” Mr. Maimone said.

Since her return to the United States, Ms. Knox has been involved with the Innocence Project and has hosted a Facebook series and a podcast on true crime for Sundance on justice issues. At a seminar on Friday in Modena, she hugged fellow exonerees Peter Pringle, who was wrongfully imprisoned on a murder charge in Ireland for 15 years, and Angelo Massaro, who was wrongly imprisoned for 21 years in Italy on a murder charge.

From the dais in a conference center, Mr. Pringle recalled the moment he was released from prison and saw the news media mosh-pit waiting outside “like a bunch of locusts.”

“Amanda, am I right?” he called out to her in the dark auditorium. Her response, if any, was unknown.

In the afternoon, Ms. Knox watched a 2016 documentary, “Non Voltarti Indietro,” about five Italians who were wrongfully detained, and the devastating impact it had on their lives. In the discussion afterward, speaking in slightly accented but very good Italian, Ms. Knox joked with one of the five exonerees, Lucia Fiumberti, about jailhouse superstitions.

Ms. Knox nodded her head knowingly when another exoneree, Antonio Lattanzi, remembered putting all his belongings in the plain garbage bags provided by the prison when he was set free.

The festival touched on a number of legal and forensic questions, but focused on the chilling leitmotif: This could happen to you.

“Immediately, we’re like brothers; you are part of a worldwide fellowship of exonerees,” Mr. Pringle said.

The media plays a fundamental role in forging public opinion about such cases, experts say. A white paper for the Italian criminal lawyer’s association found that 82 percent of news coverage of criminal cases “favor the prosecution thesis,” Mr. Maimone said. Television mock-ups of high-profile cases and true-crime shows “pass the idea that anyone can judge a trial,” even if they do not have the facts of the case, he added.

In the United States, audience-pleasers like the podcast “Serial” and the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer” have shined a light on the issue. Time magazine published a special edition on wrongful convictions, placing it “at the checkout counter, as though it were a Marylin Monroe cover,” said a conference participant, Mark A. Godsey, a professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Law and an authority on wrongful convictions, who directs the Ohio Innocence Project.

In her prepared speech, Ms. Knox said that she was grateful that her innocence had been ultimately acknowledged.

“This does not absolve the state of having tried me for eight long years, with no real proof and on the basis of an absurd theory, and it does not absolve the media who profited from selling a scandalous story,” she said.

But she added that she hoped to one day meet Giuliano Mignini, the prosecutor who had put her behind bars, so that he could see her as a person and not a defendant.

“I hope he will see that I am not a monster, simply Amanda,” she said.

At the end, the audience gave her a standing ovation.

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The creator of 'Pokémon Go' is suing an 'association of hackers' that it says helps players cheat at its games

john hanke niantic

  • Niantic, the creator of “Pokémon Go” and the forthcoming “Harry Potter: Wizards Unite,” has filed suit against Global++, an “association of hackers” that allegedly makes and distributes “hacked” versions of its games. 
  • Those versions, which Niantic calls “hacked” and Global++ apparently calls “tweaks,” give players what Niantic says is an unfair advantage — and infringes on Niantic’s intellectual property, it alleges in the lawsuit. 
  • The lawsuit comes shortly before Niantic is expected to officially launch “Harry Potter,” which has been in a beta phase in Australia and New Zealand since April. 
  • “Niantic files this motion on the eve of the United States launch of Harry Potter, the culmination of a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment by Niantic, the success of which is threatened by defendants’ unlawful conduct,” Niantic says in its motion for a preliminary injunction. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

“Pokémon Go,” the mega-popular smartphone game from developer Niantic, has had to stay one step ahead of cheaters since its launch in 2016. 

Some players have used a surprisingly sophisticated array of tools to circumvent the rules and do things like automatically walk in circles to hatch Pokémon eggs, spot exactly where rare monsters are hiding, and even spoof their GPS location so they can trick the game into thinking they’re suddenly halfway around the world. 

Now, Niantic is drawing a line in the sand, as it files a lawsuit against Global++ — what it describes as an “association of hackers” that allegedly makes and distributes “unauthorized derivative versions” of apps including “Pokémon Go” and “Ingress,” another game made by Niantic. Those apps, called “PokeGo++” and “Ingress++,” give users an unfair advantage, while simultaneously infringing on Niantic’s intellectual property rights, Niantic says in the lawsuit.

Also named as defendants in the suit are alleged members of Global++, including one Ryan “ElliotRobot” Hunt, who Niantic describes as “leader” of the group, and the “principal developer” of these unauthorized apps, as well as Alen “iOS n00b” Hundur, who Niantic says helps develop the apps at issue, and promotes them on a YouTube channel. The lawsuit also names 20 so-called “Doe defendants” — members of Global++ who couldn’t be personally identified. 

“Among other things, defendants’ schemes undermine the integrity of the gaming experience for legitimate players, diminishing enthusiasm for Niantic’s games and, in some cases, driving players away from Niantic’s games altogether. Defendants’ schemes therefore damage Niantic’s reputation and goodwill and interfere with Niantic’s business,” the lawsuit says. 

Niantic is seeking a preliminary injunction in this lawsuit, which would require Global++ and its members to immediately stop distributing the apps at issue, as well as to stop any work on reverse engineering the code to its games. In the motion for this preliminary injunction, Niantic refers to the apps in question as “hacked,” and says that that Global++ itself refers to them as “tweaks.”

The lawsuit further alleges that the Global++ group has earned money by selling “subscriptions” to these allegedly “hacked” apps: “On information and belief, defendants have sold ‘subscriptions’ to their Cheating Programs to hundreds of thousands of users, reaping massive profits,” the lawsuit claims.

Notably, while the complaint refers to Global++ as “hackers,” nowhere in the complaint does Niantic indicate that its users’ personal information was compromised by the group. Which is to say, there doesn’t appear to be any reason to believe that Global++ had access to any data of those playing Niantic’s own, standard-issue versions of each game.

pokemon go pokego

The Harry Potter connection

The suit alleges that the Global++ organization has already developed “Potter++,” a cracked version of “Harry Potter: Wizards Unite” — Niantic’s next big game, expected to launch soon. The game has been undergoing beta testing in New Zealand and Australia since April. 

Niantic and co-developer WB Games are hosting a special event on Tuesday at Universal Studios Hollywood, where more details on the game and its launch are expected.

“Niantic files this motion on the eve of the United States launch of Harry Potter, the culmination of a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment by Niantic, the success of which is threatened by defendants’ unlawful conduct,” Niantic says in its motion for a preliminary injunction. 

Representatives for Global++ did not immediately respond to a request for comment sent via the organization’s Facebook page.

SEE ALSO: I tried ‘Harry Potter: Wizards Unite,’ the new game from the creators of ‘Pokémon Go,’ and it’s magical

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NOW WATCH: The reason people go gray in their 20s, according to a dermatologist

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Is Criminal Minds On Netflix? – TV Guide

Do you have 300+ hours of your life to spare? Great, because there are more than 300 episodes of Criminal Minds that you could, and should, start bingeing.

The long-running CBS series is about to enter into its 15th, and also final, season in the 2019-2020 season, and if you’re looking to catch up on it before it’s over, you’ve got time. The show follows a group of behavioral profilers who work for the FBI as members of its Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU). Over the years, the show has seen cast members come and go (Mandy Patinkin started with the series back in 2005 before Joe Mantegna took over as the Senior Supervisory Special Agent) and produced not one but two short-lived spin-offs (Beyond Borders and Suspect Behavior). But since the original series is still going strong as it heads into its final stretch, we’re here to help you catch up with all the action.

Discover your new favorite show: Watch This Now!

Is Criminal Minds on Netflix?

Good news! Criminal Minds is on Netflix! However, there’s a catch: Only the first 12 seasons are on Netflix. It’s unclear if there are plans to add the two most recent seasons, Seasons 13 and 14, to the streaming site any time soon.

Is Criminal Minds on Hulu?

Nope. Criminal Minds is not currently available to stream on Hulu.

Currently, all episodes of Criminal Minds are available on Prime Video, but you’ve got to pay to watch them. You can purchase an entire season (ranging from $9.99 to $34.99), but individual episodes are all priced at $2.99. You can also purchase CBS All Access as an add-on channel for $5.99 a month and stream all of Season 14.

Criminal Minds is on CBS All Access, but not all of Criminal Minds. Currently, only the 15 episodes of Season 14 are available to watch. If you’re looking to see earlier seasons, you’re out of luck.

<img src="https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2019/02/05/b46454ba-3c88-4104-8c56-5c0c70404f28/190204-joe-mantegna-criminal-minds.jpg|https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2019/02/05/b46454ba-3c88-4104-8c56-5c0c70404f28/190204-joe-mantegna-criminal-minds.jpg|https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2019/02/05/b46454ba-3c88-4104-8c56-5c0c70404f28/190204-joe-mantegna-criminal-minds.jpg" class="article-attached-image-img b-lazy" alt="Joe Mantegna, Criminal Minds” width=”2070″ height=”1380″ title=”Joe Mantegna, Criminal Minds” data-amp-src=”https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2019/02/05/b46454ba-3c88-4104-8c56-5c0c70404f28/190204-joe-mantegna-criminal-minds.jpg”>Joe Mantegna, Criminal Minds

(Disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation.)

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Fla. judge declines to hold Robert Kraft's attorneys in criminal contempt – The Boston Globe

A Florida judge Friday rejected prosecutors’ request to hold Robert Kraft’s top defense lawyers in criminal contempt for their interactions with law enforcement witnesses during a hearing in which Kraft won a major legal victory.

In a four-page order issued Friday, Palm Beach County Court Judge Leonard Hanser wrote that he had reviewed the allegations made by State Attorney Dave Aronberg, considered existing case law on the issue of contempt, and concluded that the actions by attorneys William Burck and Alex Spiro were not crimes.

Kraft, the billionaire owner of the New England Patriots, is facing charges that he paid for sex during two visits to a Florida spa in January. His attorneys have mounted a fierce defense.

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“The Court concludes that the issues raised in the State’s Motion and the factual patterns cited by the State in support of its Motion, if true, are more appropriately addressed by any party feeling itself aggrieved” taking their case to lawyer disciplinary panels, Hanser wrote.

Mike Edmonson, spokesman for Aronberg, said prosecutors are currently reviewing Hanser’s decision.

In May, Aronberg’s office alleged that Burck and Spiro offered false evidence when the defense questioned Jupiter Police Officer Scott Kimbark during a May 1 hearing on Kraft’s motion to suppress secretly recorded surveillance video allegedly showing Kraft twice paying for sex.

At the hearing, Spiro repeatedly challenged Kimbark with accusations that his body camera had recorded him during a vehicle stop telling another officer that the lack of probable cause for the stop did not matter because he would just “make some [expletive] up.”

Police made traffic stops on the cars of spa patrons to identify who the patrons were.

Prosecutors said that a review of the radio transmissions and the body camera video found that Kimbark never made the inflammatory remark, according to the motion.

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In court papers, Burck and Spiro fired back at Aronberg’s office. “Unable to justify a lawless, indefensible prosecution on its merits, the State has resorted to trying to smear defense counsel,’’ the lawyers wrote.

Hanser, who presided over the hearing, ruled in Kraft’s favor and barred Aronberg’s office from using the videos to prosecute the 77-year-old Kraft on two misdemeanor counts of soliciting another into prostitution while at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa on Jan. 19 and Jan. 20.

Kraft has denied engaging in criminal activity, pleaded not guilty, and requested a jury trial.

Prosecutors and Kraft have appealed Hanser’s decision to the Fourth District Court of Appeal as both sides agree the use of secretly installed video cameras to investigate prostitution raises constitutional questions about privacy rights that no court has previously addressed.

The appellate court is currently deciding whether to take the case.


John R. Ellement can be reached at ellement@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.

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Hackers stole photos of travelers' faces and license plates collected by the US Customs and Border Protection agency

Airport security laptops

Hackers broke into a database of images of travelers and license plates collected by US Customs and Border Protection, the agency said on Monday.

The hackers gained access to the images through a subcontractor’s network, CBP said. The subcontractor, which the agency declined to name, had transferred the photographs to its network in violation of CBP policies, the agency said.

“CBP has alerted members of Congress and is working closely with other law enforcement agencies and cybersecurity entities and its own office of professional responsibility to actively investigate the incident,” the agency said in a statement.

The agency became aware on May 31 that the subcontractor had transferred the images to its network. CBP did not say when the subcontractor transferred the photographs, when the cyber attack occurred, or how many images were accessed by the hackers.

Read this: Internet pioneer Paul Vixie thinks we’re giving up both privacy and speed thanks to the way we’ve configured our internet connections

Agency spokesman Mike Niezgoda declined to comment on the incident beyond CBP’s statement, which he pasted into an email message.

The agency released a separate copy of the statement as a Microsoft Word document that was entitled, “CBP Perceptics Public Statement,” according to the Washington Post, which first reported the security breach. The title seemed to indicate that Perceptics, a company that offers license-plate reader technology, was involved in the incident.

Niezgoda declined to confirm whether Perceptics was connected to the breach. Company representatives did not respond to an email seeking comment.

The CBP had been collecting images of travelers at airports and at land border crossings. It has also begun to use facial recognition to identify travelers, including those trying to enter the country illegally.

Got a tip about computer security industry? Contact this reporter via email at twolverton@businessinsider.com, message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.

SEE ALSO: One of the internet’s creators says there’s a potential of severe dangers from the ‘avalanche of devices’ on the network

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Ranking the Most Horrific Major UnSubs on 'Criminal Minds' (PHOTOS) – TVInsider

The BAU doesn’t always get the job done (right away, at least).

Over 14 seasons of Criminal Minds, the same UnSub has occasionally appeared more than once. And in some cases, those offenders leave a lasting impression on at least one member of the team. In fact, Season 14 has already teased one such serial killer will return in the final season, as Everett Lynch (Michael Mosley), introduced in Episode 13, “Chameleon,” escaped after leaving an unconscious Rossi (Joe Mantegna) alive.

But we have yet to see how he’ll be remembered when his time as an adversary for the team ends. In the meantime, TV Insider has ranked the major UnSubs — some are Big Bads, while others will always be remembered by fans for the heinous acts they committed in their episodes — of the CBS drama so far from most to least horrific and memorable.

Click through the gallery to see where killers like Mr. Scratch, Foyet, and Frank land.

Criminal Minds, 15th and Final Season, Coming Soon, CBS

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