'Criminal Minds' Recap: Prentiss Faces off Against Assistant Director Barnes – BuddyTV (blog)

A mass grave is uncovered in this episode of Criminal Minds, but it’s impossible not to care (a lot) more about what’s going on with Barnes’ investigation into the team, specifically Prentiss’ leadership.

“Miasma” sees J.J. as the team’s acting unit chief while they head to New Orleans for the case, and while I do like seeing her in charge — especially when I think about how far she’s come since season 1 — it’s just not the same without Prentiss with the team and as its leader. But Prentiss has much more important things to worry about than catching an UnSub, so it’s a good thing she can trust her team to do their jobs.

Prentiss vs. Barnes

Picking up right where “Cure” left off, Barnes wants to know why J.J. thinks she wasn’t chosen to take over after Hotch left. Prentiss was the natural choice and had seniority, J.J. says, instead wanting to know why Emily’s being placed on administrative leave.

With the one year anniversary of Reid’s arrest coming up, it’s standard operating procedure for the director to initiate an internal audit, so Barnes will be going over the BAU’s caseload to make sure they’re following protocol and Prentiss will need to give a full account of the team’s actions. Though Barnes tells J.J. to keep it between them, when Prentiss calls her about a case, J.J. tells her something’s going on.

It’s just a standard administrative review, Prentiss tells the team before sending them off with J.J. in charge, but as Simmons tells everyone, this is what happened right before Barnes disbanded the IRT. There’s nothing to worry about because they haven’t done anything wrong … right?

Barnes’ first question for Prentiss is if J.J. called her (as she expected she would) and she thinks that she’s lying when she said no. However, as Prentiss explains, she called J.J. Prentiss is off to a good start, but Barnes is determined to shake her, recalling the team’s investigation following Reid’s arrest. With Prentiss at the helm, she states, it seems like team loyalty is more important than bureau policy. They’re there to discuss the state of the BAU under her leadership.

But Prentiss has an answer for every “problem” Barnes brings up, from the recent case in Roswell to Reid’s arrest to the Scratch investigation and even Walker’s death. His death was a tragedy, Emily states, and since Barnes isn’t in the field, she can’t understand the snap decisions that have to be made. When Barnes brings up Reid’s statement that she deleted, something that could result in charges for obstruction of justice and end her career, Prentiss asks for a break.

Barnes is trying to rattle her, Rossi tells her when he checks in, and Prentiss admits that she doesn’t know what Linda’s after. “Don’t let her push her around,” Rossi says, reminding her that she’s earned her job.

And so when Prentiss goes back into Barnes’ office, she goes on the offensive. She tells Barnes she knows she wants to make a name for herself, that she can’t get enough power. She knows Barnes wants to be director, but better agents have tried and failed to split up the BAU. (Here’s the thing: I know we’re not supposed to like Linda Barnes, but I do enjoy these scenes with Paget Brewster and Kim Rhodes.)

After another break, Barnes turns the focus to the team, specifically Rossi and Reid. She questions Rossi’s focus with his books and family and suggests Reid’s better off in the academic world, teaching like he has been. Her investigation has revealed a pattern of negligence in the BAU. Prentiss refuses to give her a fall guy to avoid bad PR and give Barnes a win. Rossi and Reid are indispensable, she insists, and she stands by her team.

But while Prentiss can hold her own against Barnes, she doesn’t have good news for the team when they return after the case. She’s been suspended from active duty indefinitely. J.J. will continue being acting unit chief. And Barnes will be personally overseeing the unit. They are under investigation, and while she tried, with her suspension, Prentiss can’t protect them.

The UnSub vs. Sickness

As for the case, the team (minus Prentiss) heads to New Orleans to investigate a mass grave of 10 bodies, drained of their blood, in a vandalized crypt in Treme Cemetery. With Xes on the crypt denoting a grave of a voodoo practitioner, they wonder if they’re dealing with ritualistic killings.

The UnSub strikes again, wearing a mask as he holds a chicken over his victim’s body before draining him of his blood. This victim is disposed of in another crypt, one without any markings, suggesting that’s not as important to the UnSub as they thought. With his elaborate M. O. (concealing and burning the bodies), they wonder if the UnSub is on a mission.

CBS Sets Criminal Minds Season 13 Finale Date>>>

The UnSub drained his victims of their blood and burned their bodies postmortem, with the cause of death a large quantity of pure ketamine, practically painless. It suggests he doesn’t want them to suffer, like he’s putting them out of misery, perhaps. The cemetery is important to him. Did he lose someone?

Some of the original 10 victims were homeless or working professionals, while the latest left work early claiming not to feel well. And the next victim the UnSub targets is coughing at a bus stop before he grabs him in his van. However, he’s a big guy, so it seems the UnSub didn’t give him enough ketamine because he wakes up before he’s strapped down, fights back and drives off in the UnSub’s van. However, Carl is still out of it and crashes into a parked vehicle.

Garcia tracks the VIN number of the van and discovers it was stolen from Houston eight years ago. They’re able to determine where the UnSub was holding his victims based on information from Carl, and there they find his mask and Reid realizes what’s going on: with two of the victims reportedly sick before they were taken, the UnSub views himself as a modern-day plague doctor. He thinks it’s his job to take care of them before they can contaminate others.

The UnSub’s trigger is sickness, real or perceived. Medieval practitioners thought that chickens could absorb illness, hence the dead ones in the UnSub’s lair.

The UnSub likely lost a loved one and blames modern medicine for not saving that person. (He did. A flashback shows that there was bacteria in the UnSub’s mother’s blood, and he blames the doctors for not helping her.)

In his van, the agents find medications (some dated back to 2008) without any identifying information, but for a lung condition or breathing ailment. His van was his whole life, and there’s no telling what he’ll do next now that he’s lost it. He’s going through the stages of grief and anger could be next. He could start to lash out, meaning that they need to get extra security to hospitals and pharmacies.

And health clinics, they’ll soon realize, as the UnSub spots a woman coming out of one coughing and goes inside to confront the doctor about letting the “contaminated” woman leave. Doctors couldn’t help his mother and just make people suffer, he declares, correcting this one when she says that people just get sick but his mother was “made sick.” When she goes for a pair of scissors, he gets to them first, pours rubbing alcohol all over, ignites it with his lighter and stabs her.

The UnSub may be devolving with this latest attack, but he’s also showing an evolution of thought by punishing those in the medical profession. His next step may be going after those he sees responsible for his loss.

And that’s connected back to his first victim, who, as it turns out, was his own mother. Every kill since has been about justifying that action and easing his own guilt. Dead flowers in his van lead them to the woman who sent them, and she tells them everything they need to know.

Tanesa Winters was her neighbor, and after Hurricane Katrina, she lived in a flop house that was condemned. The tenants filed a civil suit, with her the primary plaintiff. They sued for negligence and bodily harm, and Tanesa became ill due to black mold. Requests for inspections were ignored. She died three weeks ago. That was the UnSub’s stressor. The UnSub is her son.

And her son, Kevon, is going after the landlord, Walter, who is now a business mogul and spends his time at a bar he owns. Kevon arrives while J.J. and Rossi are talking to Walter in his office and pours gasoline all over the bar. They can’t risk taking a shot with the gasoline vapors in the air, so they have to talk him down and get close enough. That’s just what they do, securing Kevon’s lighter and cuffing him.

Are you worried about the future of the team? What did you think of Prentiss’ face-offs with Barnes? And what did you think of the case?

Criminal Minds season 13 airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on CBS. Want more news? Like our Criminal Minds Facebook page.

(Image courtesy of CBS)

whichcriminalminds.jpg

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Larry Nassar's lawyer gets death threats in MSU sex abuse case: 'It's been insane' – WZZM

Criminal defense attorney Shannon Smith is no stranger to sneers or snide comments, given her often unpopular clients.

But representing Larry Nassar has triggered a backlash she has never seen before: several death threats, loads of hate mail and nasty phone calls.

Smith said that she has received at least 10 death threats in recent weeks for representing the disgraced Michigan State University physician in a sex abuse scandal involving at least 160 female athletes.

One threat, she said, came through an intake form on her website from someone who wrote: “I’m going to rape your children. And then rape you in front of your children. And then murder your children in front of you but let you live.”

Another person called her Oakland County law office and left a message telling her: “You better pack your bags and get out of town.”

One of Smith’s colleagues in the Nassar case also has received death threats, along with his children, who have been escorted to school as a result, Smith said. 

“What we’ve been through has been insane and unfair,” Smith told the Free Press on Wednesday. “I understand why the girls (Nassar’s victims) would have resentful feelings toward us … but a lot of people in our country just don’t understand our roles. It’s been insane.”

Defense attorney Mary Chartier said the backlash received by Smith prompted her to write a letter of support in which she defended both Smith and the role of defense lawyers in the criminal justice system. The letter, which was signed by 300 defense lawyers, notes:

“It is definitely unpopular to be a criminal defense attorney, especially one who represents people accused of serious and often heinous crimes,” Chartier writes. “There are many who think we should apologize for what we do and many who view us with disdain.”

But defense lawyers are critical to the justice system, Chartier writes, stressing: “It is defense attorneys who hold the government and our courts accountable. Without defense attorneys, there is no rule of law.”

Melissa Powell, president of the Michigan Prosecuting Attorneys Association, echoed those sentiments, stressing a criminal defendant’s right to a lawyer is “the bedrock of our constitution.”

Powell compared the role of a criminal defense attorney in a heinous case to that of a surgeon who provides a lifesaving procedure to a criminal with a bad background. 

“They have taken an oath to provide that service,” Powell said of criminal defense lawyers, noting she’s often tries to educate people who question how someone could represent a killer or a rapist. She said criminal defense work is challenging.

“It’s difficult work and it’s stressful work,” Powell said. “But it’s necessary work. You can’t expect a defendant who is not versed in the law to do a good job representing himself in court. And a lot of these cases are very complex.”

In the Nassar case, at issue for defense lawyers was the focus of the case shifting from the defendant to the defense attorneys, especially during sentencing.

 Nassar was sentenced on Jan. 24 to 40-175 years in prison as part of a plea deal on seven counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct after the judge listened to several days of statements from many of his victims.

One of Nassar’s victims, gymnast Rachel Denhollander, used part of her impact statement to rebuke Smith for suggesting at a prior hearing that she only came forward to earn notoriety and cash.

Denhollander said in court that “only one of us was making money off her court appearance that day.” 

The defense objected, but the crowd started shouting and the judge shut her down.

“The victims are entitled to express how they were victimized, but I think it’s going out of bounds when you attack the attorney for simply doing their job,” said local criminal defense attorney Art Weiss, who believes the judge should have “reined” some of the testimony in.

Weiss and other criminal defense lawyers also took issue with Judge Rosemarie Aquilina telling Nassar at sentencing: “I just signed your death warrant.”

“What he pleaded guilty to was horrific. However, a judge still has to maintain that appearance of impartiality. When the judge starts taunting or demeaning the defendant, saying ‘I just signed your death warrant’ … I think that crosses the line,” Weiss said.

At another point during sentencing, the defense objected to another victim calling out the defense for supporting Nassar. But Ingham County CIrcuit Judge Aquilina let the testimony continue, telling Smith: “I think you have thick enough skin to let it go where it should.” 

Detroit criminal defense attorney Bill Swor said it was “outrageous” that the judge allowed “personal attacks” on Smith during sentencing.

He also defended the role of the criminal defense attorneys.

“The core principle of our legal system is that everyone is entitled to a real defense, no matter who and no matter what crime,” Swor said. “Lawyers take an oath to do just that. Our constitutional system could not work otherwise.”

And as for those who are criticizing Smith for representing Nassar, Swor said: “If they were charged with a crime, no matter what crime, they sure would want their lawyer to defend them as well as Shannon defended Dr. Nassar.”

The once-acclaimed sports medicine doctor who worked with the U.S. Olympic team and treated MSU athletes deceived young girls and women for more than two decades. They went to him for pain relief when he manipulated them into believing his treatments — which involved inserting his fingers into their vaginas, sometimes without gloves or lubrication — was medical care. 

Nassar’s crimes came to light following a 2016 Indianapolis Star exposé about sexual abuse at USA Gymnastics.

►Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the WZZM 13 app now.

Have a news tip? Email news@wzzm13.com, visit our Facebook page or Twitter.

© 2018 Detroit Free Press

.oembed-asset-link background: #fff; border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1;
.oembed-link-anchor display: block; clear: both; .oembed-link-thumbnail float: left; padding: 14px;
.oembed-link-thumbnail img max-width: 78px; max-height: 60px; display: block;
p.oembed-link-title font-size: 75%; color: #009BFF; margin: 0 14px; padding-top: 12px; font-weight:normal;
text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
p.oembed-link-desc font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px;
font-family: ‘Futura Today Light’; text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
.oembed-asset-link background: #fff; border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1;
.oembed-link-anchor display: block; clear: both; .oembed-link-thumbnail float: left; padding: 14px;
.oembed-link-thumbnail img max-width: 78px; max-height: 60px; display: block;
p.oembed-link-title font-size: 75%; color: #009BFF; margin: 0 14px; padding-top: 12px; font-weight:normal;
text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
p.oembed-link-desc font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px;
font-family: ‘Futura Today Light’; text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
.oembed-asset-link background: #fff; border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1;
.oembed-link-anchor display: block; clear: both; .oembed-link-thumbnail float: left; padding: 14px;
.oembed-link-thumbnail img max-width: 78px; max-height: 60px; display: block;
p.oembed-link-title font-size: 75%; color: #009BFF; margin: 0 14px; padding-top: 12px; font-weight:normal;
text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
p.oembed-link-desc font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px;
font-family: ‘Futura Today Light’; text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
.oembed-asset-link background: #fff; border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1;
.oembed-link-anchor display: block; clear: both; .oembed-link-thumbnail float: left; padding: 14px;
.oembed-link-thumbnail img max-width: 78px; max-height: 60px; display: block;
p.oembed-link-title font-size: 75%; color: #009BFF; margin: 0 14px; padding-top: 12px; font-weight:normal;
text-align: left; line-height: 120%;
p.oembed-link-desc font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px;
font-family: ‘Futura Today Light’; text-align: left; line-height: 120%;

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Apple's software update that slowed down older iPhones is reportedly being investigated by the DOJ (AAPL)

Tim Cook angry sad

  • Apple is under fire for a software update that slowed down processor speeds on older iPhones.
  • Now the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have started an investigation, according to a Bloomberg report.

The US Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission have started investigating an Apple software update that slowed down older iPhones, according to a Bloomberg report.

Apple acknowledged late last year than an iPhone software update issued in February 2017 slowed down the processors on some older devices. The company said the update was designed to prevent unexpected shutdowns in devices with older batteries.

The purported investigations by the DOJ and the SEC wouldn’t be the first pushes for more information from Apple. Groups in both the Senate and the House of Representatives have questioned Apple, and the company faces more than 45 class-action lawsuits from consumers.

Apple wasn’t immediately available to comment. “We don’t confirm or deny investigations,” a representative for the Department of Justice said.

Apple previously said it planned to release a new software update later this spring that would allow iPhone users to turn off the feature that diminished performance.

SEE ALSO: Tim Cook says Apple told users it was slowing their iPhones, but adds, ‘I don’t think a lot of people were paying attention’

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The end of the iPhone X cycle could send Apple’s stock tumbling

Source link

Criminal Minds Exclusive: Linda Barnes Has Prentiss in Her Crosshairs – TV Guide

Well, we finally know what Linda Barnes (Kim Rhodes) is up to on Criminal Minds, and as suspected, it’s not good.

In this week’s exclusive clip, Barnes reveals that she’s not going after the entire BAU — just Prentiss (Paget Brewster). She’s using Reid’s (Matthew Gray Gubler) arrest in Mexico last year as a catalyst into how the BAU has performed under Prentiss and our fair leader’s job may be at risk.

Criminal Minds Exclusive: Is Linda Barnes Trying to Split Up the BAU?

According to Barnes, “mistakes have been made” since Prentiss has expanded the team and now her performance as BAU leader is going to be evaluated. She claims that the team is guilty of putting loyalty above FBI process, which isn’t going to fly with Barnes who has ambitions of making director.

Is Prentiss going to be able to survive this witch hunt or will the BAU be looking at getting another leader this season?

Criminal Minds airs Wednesdays at 10/9c.

(Full disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Larry Nassar's lawyer gets death threats in MSU sex abuse case: 'It's been insane' – Detroit Free Press

CLOSE

The final sentencing hearing began Wednesday for disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar, who was again confronted by victims as he faced another prison sentence for molesting gymnasts at an elite Michigan club run by an Olympic coach.
Time

Nassar’s defense lawyers and their kids receive death threats in the wake of the MSU doctor’s sex abuse case; say they’ve been unfairly attacked

Criminal defense attorney Shannon Smith is no stranger to sneers or snide comments, given her often unpopular clients.

But representing Larry Nassar has triggered a backlash she has never seen before: several death threats, loads of hate mail and nasty phone calls.

Smith said that she has received at least 10 death threats in recent weeks for representing the disgraced Michigan State University physician in a sex abuse scandal involving at least 160 female athletes.

One threat, she said, came through an intake form on her website from someone who wrote: “I’m going to rape your children. And then rape you in front of your children. And then murder your children in front of you but let you live.”

MORE:
2004 police report: Teen felt ‘uncomfortable,’ ‘scared’ after Nassar appointment
Engler assures lawmakers, governor that MSU changes are coming

Another person called her Oakland County law office and left a message telling her: “You better pack your bags and get out of town.”

One of Smith’s colleagues in the Nassar case also has received death threats, along with his children, who have been escorted to school as a result, Smith said. 

“What we’ve been through has been insane and unfair,” Smith told the Free Press on Wednesday. “I understand why the girls (Nassar’s victims) would have resentful feelings toward us … but a lot of people in our country just don’t understand our roles. It’s been insane.”

Local defense attorney Mary Chartier said the backlash received by Smith prompted her to write a letter of support in which she defended both Smith and the role of defense lawyers in the criminal justice system. The letter, which was signed by 300 defense lawyers, notes:

“It is definitely unpopular to be a criminal defense attorney, especially one who represents people accused of serious and often heinous crimes,” Chartier writes. “There are many who think we should apologize for what we do and many who view us with disdain.”

But defense lawyers are critical to the justice system, Chartier writes, stressing: “It is defense attorneys who hold the government and our courts accountable. Without defense attorneys, there is no rule of law.”

Melissa Powell, president of the  Michigan Prosecuting Attorneys Association, echoed those sentiments, stressing a criminal defendant’s right to a lawyer is “the bedrock of our constitution.”

Powell compared the role of a criminal defense attorney in a heinous case to that of a surgeon who provides a lifesaving procedure to a criminal with a bad background. 

“They have taken an oath to provide that service,” Powell said of criminal defense lawyers,  noting she’s often tries to educate people who question how someone could represent a killer or a rapist. She said criminal defense work is challenging.

“It’s difficult work and it’s stressful work,” Powell said. “But it’s necessary work. You can’t expect a defendant who is not versed in the law to do a good job representing himself in court. And a lot of these cases are very complex.”

In the Nassar case, at issue for defense lawyers was the focus of the case shifting from the defendant to the defense attorneys, especially during sentencing.

 Nassar was sentenced on Jan. 24 to 40-175 years in prison as part of a plea deal on seven counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct after the judge listened to several days of statements from many of his victims.

One of Nassar’s victims, gymnast Rachel Denhollander, used part of her impact statement to rebuke Smith for suggesting at a prior hearing that she only came forward to earn notoriety and cash.

Denhollander said in court that “only one of us was making money off her court appearance that day.” 

Smith objected, but the crowd started shouting and the judge shut her down.

“The victims are entitled to express how they were victimized, but I think it’s going out of bounds when you attack the attorney for simply doing their job,” said local criminal defense attorney Art Weiss, who believes the judge should have “reined” some of the testimony in.

Weiss and other criminal defense lawyers also took issue with Judge Rosemarie Aquilina telling Nassar at sentencing: “I just signed your death warrant.”

“What he pleaded guilty to was horrific. However, a judge still has to maintain that appearance of impartiality. When the judge starts taunting or demeaning the defendant, saying ‘I just signed your death warrant’ … I think that crosses the line,” Weiss said.

At another point during sentencing, Smith objected to another victim calling out the defense for supporting Nassar. But Ingham County CIrcuit Judge Aquilina let the testimony continue, telling Smith: “I think you have thick enough skin to let it go where it should.” 

Detroit criminal defense attorney Bill Swor said it was “outrageous” that the judge allowed “personal attacks” on Smith during sentencing.

He also defended the role of the criminal defense attorneys.

“The core principle of our legal system is that everyone is entitled to a real defense, no matter who and no matter what crime,”  Swor said. “Lawyers take an oath to do just that. Our constitutional system could not work otherwise.”

And as for those who are criticizing Smith for representing Nassar, Swor said: “If they were charged with a crime, no matter what crime, they sure would want their lawyer to defend them as well as Shannon defended Dr. Nassar.”

The once-acclaimed sports medicine doctor who worked with the U.S. Olympic team and treated MSU athletes deceived young girls and women for more than two decades. They went to him for pain relief when he manipulated them into believing his treatments — which involved  inserting his fingers into their vaginas, sometimes without gloves or lubrication — was medical care. 

Nassar’s crimes came to light following a 2016 Indianapolis Star exposé about sexual abuse at USA Gymnastics.

Read or Share this story: http://on.freep.com/2E6C0qW

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link