Scoop: Coming Up on a New Episode of CRIMINAL MINDS, on CBS – Today, December 5, 2018 – Broadway World

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Scoop: Coming Up on a New Episode of CRIMINAL MINDS, on CBS - Today, December 5, 2018

“Broken Wing” – A professor from Lewis’ past tips off the BAU to an alarming number of overdose deaths of patients who just completed rehab, on CRIMINAL MINDS, Wednesday, Dec. 5 (10:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. Series star Aisha Tyler directed the episode.

CRIMINAL MINDS revolves around an elite team of FBI profilers who analyze the country’s most twisted criminal minds, anticipating their next moves before they strike again. The Behavioral Analysis Unit’s most experienced agent is David Rossi, founding member of the BAU, who is essential in helping the team solve new cases. Other members include Special Agent Emily Prentiss, the daughter of high-powered diplomats who returns to the team after being the head profiler at Interpol; Special Agent Dr. Spencer Reid, a classically misunderstood genius whose social IQ is as low as his intellectual IQ is high; Jennifer “J.J.” Jareau, the team’s former unit liaison turned profiler, who juggles motherhood and marriage with the same skill as she solves cases; Penelope Garcia, the team’s indispensable computer wizard who helps research the cases with her unique charm; Dr. Tara Lewis, a forensic psychologist whose expertise is studying and interviewing serial killers after they’ve been captured to determine if they are able to stand trial; Luke Alvez, a former Army ranger and excellent tracker recruited to the BAU from the FBI’s Fugitive Task Force; and Special Agent Simmons who joins his colleagues in the BAU after consulting them when he was a member of the International Response Team. Simmons is an ex-Delta soldier with deft profiling skills and military special-ops expertise. As the team evolves together, the BAU continues its dedication to using their expertise to pinpoint predators’ motivations and identify their emotional triggers in the attempt to stop them.

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'It's hugely in violation of the charter': criminal lawyer on new drunk driving laws – CityNews Vancouver

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – With stricter drunk driving laws coming into effect on Dec. 18, a criminal lawyer in Vancouver says the new law infringes on Canadian’s constitutional rights.

The new rules allow police to demand a mandatory breathalyzer test at all lawful roadside stops, even if the officer has no suspicion that the driver has been drinking.

“It’s hugely in violation of the charter,” adds Kyla Lee with Acumen Law. “People in Canada have the right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure.”

RELATED: Think before you drink: feds issue stern reminder ahead of stricter drunk driving laws

She says after Dec. 18, if police demand a sample, people are obligated to provide it, noting the consequences for refusing will be the same as if someone was convicted of impaired driving.

“So you’re facing a mandatory fine, driving prohibition, and a criminal record if you refuse to blow,” Lee adds.

WATCH: New impaired driving laws

Lee expects a constitutional challenge to the law, noting it “significantly infringes” on people’s rights.

“The Supreme Court of Canada has already dealt with this in several cases and in each occasion they ruled that it is unconstitutional to demand that people participate in road-side breath testing without police having a reasonable suspicion there’s alcohol in their bodies,” she says.

But the government has said they are confident that the law abides by the charter, arguing it will make Canadian roads safer.

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Mueller filing reveals Michael Flynn interviewed with investigators 19 times, recommends no jail time

Michael Flynn

  • In a sentencing memo, the special counsel Robert Mueller’s office recommended that former national security adviser Michael Flynn not to be incarcerated.
  • Although much of the memo is redacted, including the extent of Flynn’s cooperation with the Justice Department, it states that he assisted in the investigation “on a range of issues”
  • Flynn’s timely cooperation in the investigation was described as “particularly valuable,” because he was believed to be “one of the few people with long-term and firsthand insight.”
  • Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak in 2016, shortly before President Donald Trump’s inauguration.
  • In 2017, Trump did not rule out pardoning Flynn and accused the Justice Department of wrongdoing.

In a sentencing memo released on Tuesday, the special counsel Robert Mueller’s office recommended no jail time for former national security adviser Michael Flynn, after he was found to have lied to federal investigators about his contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

“Given the defendant’s substantial assistance and other considerations set forth below, a sentence at the low end of the guideline range — including a sentence that does not impose a term of incarceration — is appropriate and warranted,” the memo said.

Although much of the memo is redacted, including the extent of Flynn’s cooperation with an unspecified “criminal investigation,” it states that he assisted in the investigation “on a range of issues” by agreeing to 19 interviews, and “provided firsthand information about the content and interactions between [Trump’s] transition team and Russian government officials.”

Flynn also appears to have cooperated with investigators early on in their probe. Flynn’s timely cooperation in the investigation was described as “particularly valuable,” because he was believed to be “one of the few people with long-term and firsthand insight,” according to the memo.

After delaying Flynn’s case numerous times this year, prosecutors signaled in September that the case was ready to move forward with sentencing. Mueller’s office kept a tight lip on the case and reportedly recommended to the judge that it and Flynn’s counsel not reveal any new information about any developments or the extent of Flynn’s cooperation, prior to the 2018 midterm elections in November.

Flynn is scheduled to be sentenced on December 18.

Flynn’s denial of Russian contacts

Despite having denied discussing US sanctions against Russia with Kislyak, Flynn was discovered to have had done so in late 2016.

In December 2016, Flynn contacted the Kremlin to push for a block on a United Nations Security Council resolution on settlements in Israel, after he appeared to be instructed by White House senior adviser and Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner.

That same month, Flynn reached out to Kislyak again. Following then-President Barack Obama’s fresh sanctions against Russia in response to interfering in US elections, Flynn reportedly spoke with Kislyak numerous times, and advised “not escalate the situation and only respond to the US Sanctions in a reciprocal manner,” according court filings.

Russian President Vladimir Putin would later release a statement suggesting he would not retaliate against the US, and Kislyak informed Flynn of Russia’s decision. Flynn would go on to discuss his interactions with the Kremlin with senior members of Trump’s transition team.

The former three-star US Army general and director of the Defense Intelligence Agency had ardently supported President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, eventually landing a role in the White House as Trump’s national security advisor.

Read more: Mueller is about to drop major new details about 3 of the most important players in the Russia probe

flynn

Following news of Flynn’s Russia contacts, Vice President Mike Pence was caught in a crossroad after saying Flynn did not discuss sanctions. Trump declined to act for weeks after news of Flynn’s conversations came to light, despite warnings from then-acting attorney general Sally Yates that Flynn misled investigators.

Trump fired Flynn for lying to the FBI in February, but remained adamant that he did not do anything unlawful.

“I had to fire General Flynn because he lied to the Vice President and the FBI,” Trump tweeted in December 2017. “He has pled guilty to those lies. It is a shame because his actions during the transition were lawful. There was nothing to hide!”

“The president was very concerned that Gen. Flynn had misled the vice president and others,” then-White House press secretary Sean Spicer said, following Flynn’s firing.

“The president must have complete and unwavering trust for the person in that position,” Spicer added. “The evolving and eroding level of trust as a result of this situation in a series of other questionable instances is what led the president to ask for Gen. Flynn’s resignation.”

Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators in December, the first of numerous senior Trump officials, and he has since cooperated with Mueller’s office in relation to its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and former Trump attorney Michael Cohen have also pleaded guilty to a litany of crimes, including lying to Congress and investigators.

In December 2017, Trump did not rule out pardoning Flynn and accused the Justice Department of wrongdoing.

“I don’t want to talk about pardons with Michael Flynn yet,” Trump said. “We’ll see what happens, let’s see.”

SEE ALSO: Mueller is about to drop major new details about 3 of the most important players in the Russia probe

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