A Norwegian Cruise Line employee sexually assaulted an 11-year-old passenger after using a master key to enter her cabin, a lawsuit alleges (NCLH)

Norwegian Spirit cruise ship

  • A new lawsuit alleges that a Norwegian Cruise Line employee sexually assaulted an 11-year-old passenger.
  • In 2018, a steward on Norwegian‘s Spirit cruise ship entered a passenger’s cabin with a master key after being told not to do so, touching and ultimately sexually assaulting an 11-year-old female passenger, the lawsuit alleges.
  • The passenger was then subjected to questioning conducted exclusively by male employees for around three-and-a-half hours in the ship’s infirmary, according to the lawsuit.
  • Norwegian Cruise Line did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Norwegian Cruise Line employee sexually assaulted an 11-year-old passenger, a lawsuit alleges. 

According to the plaintiff, referred to in the complaint as Jane Doe, Norwegian failed to provide a safe environment for passengers. The company did not properly screen, train, or keep track of its employees and did not give passengers a way to prevent employees from entering their cabins without their permission, the lawsuit alleges.

Read more: Sexual assault is the most common crime reported on cruise ships

In 2018, a steward on Norwegian’s Spirit cruise ship entered Jane Doe’s cabin after being told to not disturb the plaintiff’s daughter, referred to in the complaint as Janie Doe, as she was resting, according to the lawsuit. The steward, who was around 27 at the time of the alleged incident, entered the room with a master key on four separate occasions, touching and ultimately sexually assaulting Janie Doe, the lawsuit alleges. Before leaving the cabin, the steward allegedly told Janie Doe to refrain from telling anyone about the sexual assault.

Janie Doe was then subjected to questioning conducted exclusively by male employees for around three-and-a-half hours in the ship’s infirmary, the lawsuit alleges. According to the lawsuit, Jane Doe made multiple requests for her and Janie Doe to leave the infirmary and was not permitted to do so until she “demanded” they be allowed to exit.

Norwegian Cruise Line did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Sexual assault is the most common crime reported on cruise ships, according to data from the Department of Transportation (DOT). In 2018, cruise lines reported 82 alleged sexual assaults to the DOT.

SEE ALSO: A lawyer warns of a legal nightmare you can face on a ship

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Criminal Minds is a criminal waste of time – Stuff.co.nz

Actor Matthew Gray Gubler, one of Criminal Minds' dull cast members.

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Actor Matthew Gray Gubler, one of Criminal Minds’ dull cast members.

OPINION: I watch every new series of Criminal Minds (TV One, Mondays) with interest. Is it going to improve?

No, it’s not. Why should it? Criminal Minds has basic ingredients even more lasting than baby formula.

Out there is a crazed killer or more likely a group of psychopaths. They’re often a religious cult that needs to swallow the lower intestines of rest home patients before doomsday. But help is at hand.

To confront them is a group of FBI profilers who jet round in an aircraft that’s faster than instant coffee.

READ MORE: Criminal Minds: Killer is into body parts

In the latest episode someone called The Messiah and former agent Meadows have captured Reid and Garcia. The Messiah has found some obscure verse in the Bible that requires him to kill his 300th victim. Something strange like “go thou and do likewise”.

But Garcia escapes and alerts the team. They’re not just FBI’s finest, but behavioural experts. When there’s a pause in the story they take it in turns to deliver robotic mumbo jumbo. It helps them decide what to do next. Everyone has a turn. It might be annoying to the viewers, but at least you can make a cup of tea while you’re waiting.

On this occasion their psychobabble helps them find a landing strip nearby and, in a hail of bullets, rescue Spencer Reid. The Messiah pops his clogs. Reid quotes “for everyone there’s a season” from Ecclesiastes and they all become one happy family again.

The episode is as puerile as the last series. It teaches that only bullets and bravado can solve the standoff. When lead actor Mandy Patinkin left Criminal Minds at the end of the third series he said he was distressed by its content. It would be a mercy killing if the rest of them followed.

A couple of decades ago there were two smarty-pants comics called Morecombe and Wise. Now, there’s Morecombe and lies. Morecombe is a grim fishing village in Lancashire and its two leading characters are telling fibs.

When teenage twins go missing after visiting a youth club, the stepfather, Sean Meredith, can’t explain where he was at the time. Neither can DS Armstrong, who’s leading the investigation. They both know. They were playing bouncy castles against a wall outside a pub.

Yes, it’s implausible, but adds intrigue to an otherwise routine first episode.

The Bay (TV One, Wednesdays) is no Broadchurch, but it has enough gritty reality to keep viewers guessing. DS Armstrong can either admit to having a relationship with Sean Meredith that’s even shorter than Married At First Sight, or not.

She decides not to and that becomes a distraction. The episode plods along, spending more time exploring relationships, until a body of a teenage boy is found on the beach.

Armstrong arrests Meredith. Her evidence is flimsy, but he fits the profile. He’s brooding, rough and has a designer stubble. But he might only be guilty of missing a shave. I’d enjoy The Bay more if I could care enough about the people. Armstrong might grow on me, but the rest have turned boredom into an art form.

Sadly, all the new free-to-air series this week have one thing in common. It’s crime. Whoever said crime doesn’t pay should think again. It does on television. It makes people lots of money.

The least likely new series to succeed is an old retread. Magnum PI (TV3 Wednesdays) is back and has charm. The storyline is daft, the violence is gratuitous and the characters are stereotypes, but the series doesn’t take itself seriously.

Thomas Magnum (Jay Hernandez) has a swagger as he seeks retribution after the killing of a close colleague. He’s likeable, which is a commodity important to TV heroes.

I once recall Colin Watson, a flamboyant ex-Palmerston North sculptor, telling me how he took Magda Gabor (Zsa Zsa’s sister) to a party in her white Rolls Royce. He damaged it on the way. “Don’t worry darling,” she purred. “There’s another in the garage.”

Magnum destroyed two Ferraris and found another on the driveway. I’d settle for a Lada.

I enjoy The Project (TV3, Monday to Friday). It has an impressive line-up of presenters, yet it gets sycophantic when interviewing their guests. Don’t do it. You’re far more interesting than the visiting talent.

Malcolm Hopwood is a Stuff columnist

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Tyreek Hill's lawyer denies child abuse claims, but does admit one thing his client did was 'inexcusable' – CBS Sports

Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill denies having any involvement in the alleged abuse that happened against his 3-year-old son, according to a letter from his attorney to the NFL

Although Hill has kept quiet about the situation ever since police started investigating him back in March, attorney N. Trey Pettlon wrote a letter to the NFL this week that gave Hill’s side of the story. In the letter, which was obtained by ESPN, not only does Pettlon claim that Hill has never abused his son, but he also pinned the blame for the recent abuse on Hill’s fiancee, Crystal Espinal.

Pettlon started off the letter by pointing out that police didn’t find any evidence that Hill had harmed his son during their investigation, which ran for nearly six weeks.  

“[Hill’s son] was examined and released without any indication that the accident that broke his arm was caused by Tyreek or contributed to by Tyreek, or that Tyreek was even somehow involved,” Nettlon wrote in the letter. 

After the investigation into Hill was complete, Johnson County District Attorney Stephen Howe decided not to charge the Chiefs receiver with a crime, however, Howe did make it clear that his office was absolutely convinced that a crime occurred at Hill’s house. The reason Howe’s office didn’t file any charges is because, based on the available evidence, authorities simply don’t know who committed the crime: Hill or Espinal. 

Although the criminal investigation into Hill was closed on April 24, it was reopened less than 24 hours later after a KCTV in Kansas City released a secret recording. In that recording, which Hill’s lawyer confirmed as authentic, the Chiefs receiver is heard calling his fiancee a “b–ch.” 

The comment toward Espinal came after she said that their son was terrified of Hill. 

“You need to be terrified of me, too, b–ch,” Hill is heard saying in the recording. 

Nettlon said that Hill made the “inexcusable” comment out of “frustration.”

“Instead of denying that his son was terrified of him a second time, something that bothered him a great deal, he became frustrated and said she should be terrified too,” Nettlon wrote. “That comment is inexcusable, of course, and he wouldn’t ask me to defend that here. That comment is also inconsistent with Tyreek’s conversations with Ms. Espinal over the past several months.”

During the 11-minute recording, Espinal made multiple claims against Hill, saying that Hill regularly punches their son in the chest, something that Hill’s lawyer denied. 

“[Hill] categorically denies he has ever ‘punched’ his son in the chest or anywhere on his body, or otherwise touched him in the chest in a mean-spirited manner or as a form of discipline,” Nettlon wrote. “There have been occasions when Tyreek has tapped his son gently on the chest with his fingers, while his son was crying and said, ‘man up, buddy’ or ‘don’t cry, my man.’ He has said that in a calm voice trying to redirect him. He’s never used his fist. He certainly doesn’t do it roughly. He is trying to calm his son down so he can stop crying. He is not hurting him or doing anything to make him cry more.”

Although the Johnson County District Attorney couldn’t decide who to charge, Hill’s camp insists that it’s Espinal who’s been the one abusing their son. Here’s an alleged text between and Hill and Espinal that was included in the letter to the NFL:

Tyreek: “Crystal you know I didn’t cause any bruising or harm to [our son.] But for some reason I still may be charged.” 

Crystal: “I know you didn’t. I did. I hurt [our son.] I’m the one that did it. I was hurt and mad at you so I blamed you for everything.”

The leaked recording paints a much different picture than the text above, which is likely one reason why authorities haven’t been able to figure out who to charge in the case. 

In the mean time, Hill has been indefinitely banned from all team activities with the Chiefs and likely won’t be able to return until the NFL completes its investigation into the case

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Googlers across the country staged a big 'sit-in' because they say organizers of November's sexual harassment walkouts were retaliated against (GOOG, GOOGL)

FILE - In this Nov. 1, 2018, file photo, workers protest against Google's handling of sexual misconduct allegations at the company's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. Google says it has updated the way it investigates misconduct claims, changes it pledged to make after thousands of employees walked out in protest last November. The company says the changes make it simpler for employees to file complaints about sexual misconduct or other harassment. The move follows claims by two walkout organizers that they faced Google retaliation for helping to put together the protest. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

  • Google employees in offices around the world staged a May Day “sit-in” on Wednesday to protest what they say are instances of workplace retaliation at the tech giant. 
  • The sit-in was prompted by the case of two employees who said they were demoted and forced to give up some of their duties after they helped organize November walkouts to call attention to sexual harassment at the company.
  • In New York, organizers estimated there were between 300 and 400 employees who took part in the demonstration, reading and listening to instances of retaliation.
  • In total, one Googler familiar with the matter estimated that just north of 1,000 employees participated.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google employees in offices around the world staged a May Day “sit-in” on Wednesday to protest what they say is pattern of of retaliation against workers who speak out for change at the tech giant. 

The sit-in was prompted after two employees who helped organize the November WalkoutsMeredith Whittaker and Claire Stapleton — said Google demoted them and forced them to give up some of their duties in response to their organizing efforts. 

“My manager started ignoring me, my work was given to other people, and I was told to go on medical leave, even though I’m not sick,” Stapleton said in an internal email sent to Google employees. “While my work has been restored, the environment remains hostile and I consider quitting nearly every day.”

Read more: Two Google employees who spearheaded the walkout against sexual misconduct say the company has retaliated and demoted them

On Wednesday, other Google employees joined Whittaker and Stapleton in sharing their stories of retaliation. The sit-ins took place at 11 AM local time in offices across the globe. 

In New York, organizers estimated there were between 300 and 400 employees who took part in the demonstration, reading and listening to instances of retaliation.

 

Employees in London, Ann Arbor, Boston, Pittsburgh, and its headquarters in Mountain View also took part. In total, one Googler familiar with the matter estimated that just north of 1,000 employees participated.

Stories will also be shared throughout the day on Twitter via the hashtag, #NotOkGoogle

 

In response to the sit-ins, a Google spokesperson told Business Insider in a statement: “We prohibit retaliation in the workplace and publicly share our very clear policy. To make sure that no complaint raised goes unheard at Google, we give employees multiple channels to report concerns, including anonymously, and investigate all allegations of retaliation.”

Do you work at Google? Got a tip? Contact this reporter via Signal or WhatsApp at +1 (209) 730-3387 using a non-work phone, email at nbastone@businessinsider.com, Telegram at nickbastone, or Twitter DM at @nickbastone.

SEE ALSO: Google launched a new internal portal to help employees report workplace issues, and it’s hoping the number of reports goes up as a result

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