THE TECH COLD WAR: Everything that's happened in the new China-US tech conflict involving Google, Huawei, Apple, and Trump (GOOG, GOOGL, AAPL)

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  • From tariffs and levies to the Huawei ban, the global tech industry is at the center of an escalating cold war between the US and China.
  • This clash affects giant tech companies with global supply chains, like Apple, Intel and Qualcomm. And Chinese tech giants like Huawei that want to do business with US companies. 
  • Among the causes for the standoff are accusations of unfair trade practices, economic espionage and military links. It’s involved everyone from government officials and tech execs to ordinary consumers.
  • Business Insider has covered all of the drama, and we’ve pulled together all our latest reporting on the key areas of conflict in this trans-Pacific showdown. Here’s everything you need to know.

 

Google Android and the Huawei ban

3 tech execs who tried to create new smartphone and PC operating systems explain why Huawei’s plan to build an Android replacement will be almost impossible

A Wall Street firm figured out how much money Google will sacrifice by cutting off Huawei

A longtime industry expert explains why Trump’s attack on Huawei could end up hurting Google and other US tech giants

Huawei developed a ‘plan B’ operating system for smartphones in case it was banned by the US government from using Google products. Here’s what we know about it so far.

Google has more control over Android than we realize, and right now, companies like Huawei have no other choice but to accept that

Huawei and 5G

Huawei slams Trump’s ‘unreasonable’ ban, saying that the move will only harm US interests in its own 5G rollout

President Trump’s national emergency likely won’t stop you from buying a Huawei phone, much less an iPhone. Here’s what it means for you.

Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the company is ‘fully prepared’ for a conflict with the US

Everything you need to know about Huawei, the Chinese tech giant accused of spying that the US just banned from doing business in America

Trump is being mocked on Chinese social media for giving Huawei free publicity

Here’s why it’s so hard to buy Huawei devices in the US

 

Apple and China

Chinese patriotism will halve Apple’s sales in China, analysts warn

Trump’s Huawei ban could spark a tit-for-tat fight with Beijing that puts Apple in the crossfire

Trump’s Huawei ban may have dire implications for Apple — but investors shouldn’t ‘jump to conclusions’ just yet, analyst says

Wall Street is worried that the US-China trade war could drive up iPhone prices, which is the last thing Apple needs right now

Huawei, the Chinese tech giant embroiled in controversy, just overtook Apple to become the second-largest smartphone maker

 

Artificial Intelligence, chips and enterprise software

As a tech Cold War looms, this veteran Silicon Valley patent attorney says that China’s push to win the AI processor market is a serious threat to American tech

Trump’s blacklist of Huawei has serious implications for Red Hat, Oracle, VMware, and other huge US software companies

We spent a day with China’s rock star of AI, whose new book says China’s machine learning superiority will subjugate Americans to ‘technological colonization’

Google’s former China boss says the search company won’t stand a chance against today’s Chinese ‘gladiator’ entrepreneurs

 

Spies, surveillance, trade secrets, and arrests

The US just warned that drones made in China could be used as a way to spy, but not in the way you think

The founder of Chinese tech giant Huawei reportedly expects his daughter, Huawei’s CFO, to go to jail, but he’s ‘not worried about her future’

‘My inner self has never felt so colorful and vast’: Huawei’s CFO wrote a heartfelt email to staff in a show of defiance to the US

Explosive report claims Europe’s biggest phone company found ‘backdoors’ in Huawei equipment

Huawei’s CFO was carrying a whole bunch of Apple products when she was arrested

Huawei’s security boss says the company would sooner ‘shut down’ than spy for China

Huawei is accused of attempting to copycat a T-Mobile robot, and the charges read like a comical spy movie

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Lawyers for freed Navy SEAL want war crime case dismissed – PBS NewsHour

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Attorneys for a decorated Navy SEAL facing a murder trial in the death of an Islamic State prisoner will try again Friday to have the case dismissed after their client was unexpectedly freed from custody.

A military judge released Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher from custody on Thursday, which drew gasps in a San Diego courtroom.

The judge, Capt. Aaron Rugh, said releasing Gallagher was a remedy for prosecutors interfering with his Sixth Amendment right to counsel.

Gallagher’s lawyers have condemned the prosecution for launching an unusual effort to find the source of news leaks in the politically charged case by embedding tracking code in emails sent to defense attorneys and a Navy Times journalist.

Defense attorney Tim Parlatore had accused prosecutors of a “rogue, relentless, and unlawful cyber campaign” that may have violated attorney-client privilege and hurt his client’s ability to get a fair trial.

Gallagher’s wife, Andrea, who has led a campaign to free her husband, put her hands to her face and burst into tears.

“I feel like it’s a small victory on the way to the larger victory,” Andrea Gallagher said outside court while her husband stood quietly by her side in his Navy whites.

He declined to comment.

A spokesman for the Navy prosecutors also wouldn’t comment on Gallagher’s freedom or developments at the hearing, which continues Friday.

Gallagher has pleaded not guilty to murder in the death of an injured teenage militant in Iraq in 2017 and attempted murder for allegedly picking off civilians from a sniper’s perch.

His platoon supervisor, Lt. Jacob Portier, is fighting charges of conduct unbecoming an officer for allegedly conducting Gallagher’s re-enlistment ceremony next to the militant’s corpse.

Efforts to get the case thrown out come as President Donald Trump considers pardoning several service members accused of war crimes, including Gallagher, who faces trial June 10.

Evidence at the hearing showed prosecutors enlisted a Naval Criminal Investigative Service intelligence specialist to conduct criminal background checks on three civilian lawyers, including Parlatore, and a journalist with the Navy Times who has broken several stories based on leaked documents.

On Thursday, Rugh said investigators told him privately that they planned to embed code in what he believed to be a court document to help them find the source of leaks but the judge said he didn’t have the power to authorize it and wasn’t told they planned to target emails sent to the defense lawyers or a journalist.

The lead prosecutor downplayed the move at a related hearing earlier in the day. Cmdr. Christopher Czaplak said the code embedded in the email recorded nothing more than where and when messages were opened by recipients.

Czaplak said the tracking ended May 10 after he was confronted by defense lawyers who discovered the code in an unusual logo of an American flag with a bald eagle perched on the scales of justice beneath Czaplak’s signature.

On Thursday, Czaplak said the code was similar to what marketers use to see when an email is opened and on what device.

“It’s still a web bug and it’s still unethical,” countered defense lawyer Jeremiah J. Sullivan III, who represents Portier.

The judge in Portier’s case, Capt. Jonathan Stephens, said from what he had seen the tracking effort wasn’t able to view the contents of any emails.

Several experts testified that the code couldn’t generally be used to identify a specific person or capture content.

Melley reported from Los Angeles.

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