Ranking the Most Horrific Major UnSubs on 'Criminal Minds' (PHOTOS) – TVInsider

The BAU doesn’t always get the job done (right away, at least).

Over 14 seasons of Criminal Minds, the same UnSub has occasionally appeared more than once. And in some cases, those offenders leave a lasting impression on at least one member of the team. In fact, Season 14 has already teased one such serial killer will return in the final season, as Everett Lynch (Michael Mosley), introduced in Episode 13, “Chameleon,” escaped after leaving an unconscious Rossi (Joe Mantegna) alive.

But we have yet to see how he’ll be remembered when his time as an adversary for the team ends. In the meantime, TV Insider has ranked the major UnSubs — some are Big Bads, while others will always be remembered by fans for the heinous acts they committed in their episodes — of the CBS drama so far from most to least horrific and memorable.

Click through the gallery to see where killers like Mr. Scratch, Foyet, and Frank land.

Criminal Minds, 15th and Final Season, Coming Soon, CBS

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Michigan attorney general dismisses all criminal charges in Flint Water Crisis – Fox 2 Detroit

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  1. Michigan attorney general dismisses all criminal charges in Flint Water Crisis  Fox 2 Detroit
  2. Flint Water Crisis: Prosecutors Drop All Criminal Charges  The New York Times
  3. All Flint water crisis criminal charges dismissed by attorney general’s office — for now  Detroit Free Press
  4. AG drops Flint Water Crisis cases, pending further investigation  WXYZ Detroit
  5. The Latest: Lawyer says ex-health chief feels ‘vindicated’  KSL.com
  6. View full coverage on Google News

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A college student used Snapchat's gender-swap filter to catch a police officer allegedly trying to lure a teen into a sexual relationship (SNAP)

Ethan and Ester Snapchat Gender filter

  • A 20-year-old male college student in the San Francisco Bay Area used Snapchat’s gender-swap filter to catch an alleged would-be child predator on Tinder, according to a report from NBC Bay Area.
  • Posing as a 16-year-old girl named Esther, the student says he exchanged sexual messages with a 40-year-old man on Tinder, KiK, and Snapchat.
  • After reporting the messages with Silicon Valley Crime Stoppers, investigators reportedly discovered the suspect was a San Mateo police officer named Robert Davies.
  • Davies was arrested on June 6 and charged with contacting a minor to commit a felony, according to police.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A San Mateo, California, police officer has been arrested after allegedly exchanging sexual messages with a male college student posing as a 16-year-old girl on social media.

Ethan, a San Francisco Bay Area college student, says he used Snapchat’s gender-swap filter to create a fake Tinder profile for a girl named Esther. While countless people have used the filter to see if their gender-swapped pictures are popular on social media, Ethan told NBC’s Bay Area affiliate that he was inspired to try to catch a potential child predator after a friend told him she was molested as a young girl. He declined to share his last name due to fear of retaliation.

Eventually, “Esther” was messaged by a 40-year-old man on Tinder who asked if Ethan/Esther “wanted to have some fun tonight,” according to the report. Because Tinder doesn’t allow underage profiles, the Esther account was listed as 19 years old, but Ethan says he repeatedly told the man Esther was 16 when their conversation shifted to Snapchat and KiK, another messaging app. After texting back and forth with the man for about 12 hours, Ethan reported the messages to the Silicon Valley Crime Stoppers hotline, according to NBC Bay Area.

After launching their own investigation, police detectives determined that the suspect was Robert Davies, a San Mateo police officer. Authorities executed search warrants on Davies’ electronic devices and mobile apps, leading to a felony warrant for his arrest. Davies was arrested on June 6 and charged with contacting a minor to commit a felony, according to police.

According to a statement from the San Mateo police, Davies was placed on paid administrative leave when the department became aware of the investigation.

“This alleged conduct, if true, is in no way a reflection of all that we stand for as a Department, and is an affront to the tenets of our department and our profession as a whole,” San Mateo Police Chief Susan Manheimer said in a statement shared on Facebook. “As San Mateo police officers, we have sworn an oath to serve and protect our communities. I can assure you that we remain steadfast to this commitment to serving our community with ‘Professionalism, Integrity, and Excellence.'”

You can watch an interview with Ethan below, or head over to NBC Bay Area for more details.

 

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Amazon just got hit with a lawsuit that claims it's putting children's privacy at risk by recording what they say to Alexa

Amazon Echo

Amazon’s Alexa smart home devices have sparked a new lawsuit that alleges the company recorded audio from millions of children without first getting proper consent from their parents. According to the Seattle Times, a new lawsuit filed in the city’s federal court accuses Amazon of violating privacy laws in eight different states that require all parties to consent to a voice recording, regardless of age.

Alexa-powered devices regularly record audio when activated with a wake word, which is “Alexa” by default. Earlier this year Bloomberg found that Amazon employees listen to these recordings and occasionally annotate an “extremely small sample” of them for training purposes. Bloomberg reported that members of the Amazon team that listens to these recordings can listen to as many as 1,000 clips during a nine-hour shift.

The lawsuit claims that Alexa records people regardless of whether they purchased the device or signed up to use the Alexa app, and doesn’t warn unregistered users that they’re being recorded. The suit goes on to allege that Amazon is violating laws in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Washington by not obtaining explicit consent.

Read more: There’s a simple way to make sure Amazon workers can’t listen to what you say to Alexa — here’s how to do it

While consent is required regardless of age in these states, the lawsuit is specifically concerned with protecting minors. The lawsuit claims that Amazon is using the data to glean the habits and personal information of children and “has strong commercial incentives to collect as many Alexa recordings as possible.”

If the court finds in favor of the plaintiff, the lawsuit wants Amazon to delete all recordings of underage users and prevent future recordings unless the user grants consent. Additional damages would be considered by the court during the trial. 

Alexa owners can manage how Amazon reviews their data via the Alexa app, but you need to opt-out of the “help develop new features” option. Following the Bloomberg report, Amazon introduced a new feature to have Alexa delete all of your voice recordings, but you have to opt in to activate the deletion command and it will only delete your recordings from the current calendar day. The company also launched a new Alexa privacy hub to make it easier to delete your past recordings and manage your smart device settings.

SEE ALSO: There’s a simple way to make sure Amazon workers can’t listen to what you say to Alexa — here’s how to do it

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