6 Ways to Avoid Getting Murdered, According to Criminal Minds | TV … – TV Guide

Criminal Minds is not for the faint of heart. The crime procedural is in the middle of its 14th season of reminding viewers everyone they have ever met is a potential unsub. It could be your neighbor, your accountant who is secretly planning revenge for the abuse he suffered from his mother as a child, the rejected nerd who serves you coffee every Thursday at your favorite cafe or just some random guy who saw you on the street and thinks you remind him of an ex who wronged him.

While almost every episode begins with a murder, the BAU has a pretty good track record of finding the victims who get actual dialogue before they are cut up into pieces. I’ve logged a lot of hours watching this show trying to figure out how Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler), Garcia (Kirsten Vangsness) and the rest of BAU solve the horrendous cases they are assigned. It’s entertaining watching them save the day, but Criminal Minds has also hammered home some key tips for how to avoid being captured by an unsub. You could pick the same thing up by catching a marathon on Ion or A&E, or you can check out the tips I’ve compiled here. They will probably save your life. You’re welcome.

<img src="https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2018/11/14/09a5ee10-a2ac-47d5-b624-68cd10a68c59/181113-criminal-minds-matthew-gray-gubler.jpg" class="article-attached-image-img" alt="Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds” width=”2070″ height=”1380″ title=”Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds​”>Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds

1. Parking lots are death traps, avoid them at all costs. If you’re in the mood for being kidnapped, by all means, head to a parking lot, particularly an enclosed one while you’re alone and babbling away on your cell phone. Women, alone in the dark, are nothing but targets for unsubs, and parking lots make it SO easy for you to be grabbed and shoved in the back of a van to disappear into the night. Seriously, so many second or third victims have been taken this way on Criminal Minds it is insane. If you can’t have a buddy walk with you to your car, do not be on your phone or listen to your iPod because you need your senses about you and a small can of Mace at the ready.

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2. Don’t jog in the woods by yourself. Woods/canyons/trails are the second most popular place to be abducted or to have your body ditched after you’ve been gruesomely murdered. Countless bodies have been found by the BAU team by unsuspecting outdoor fitness enthusiasts or their off-the-leash dogs. Jog at the gym or at the park in the middle of the day with lots of people around. Actually, think of timing your jog like timing a swim at the beach. Unsubs hunt for victims the same way sharks hunt for food — at dawn and dusk. Don’t be shark food, especially for a jog.

(via)

3. Learn Morse code. It might seem like a nonsensical art from the past, but it turns out Morse code is extremely useful. If you ignore the first two tips, there’s still a good chance that your unsub will take you by a security camera. That is a great time to tap out a Morse code message for the investigators so they know where you are or where the unsub might be taking you. Any way that you can communicate without giving away that you’re calling for help is going to help law enforcement find you before your unsub takes you out. This most recently helped Reid survive being kidnapped by a serial killer cult, so it can help you too.

4. Turn off location settings on your social media networks. Avoiding running trails and parking lots means nothing if you’re just going to advertise where your stalker can find you. Do you know how easy it is to follow you to your favorite frozen yogurt place when you take selfies of every delicious treat you get there? You should assume that a creep is checking every post and make it at least a little more difficult to figure out your regular routine. If he doesn’t know where you are, he can’t find you alone and murder you. Don’t make Garcia judge you for your ignorance.

The Ultimate Criminal Minds Quiz

5. Lock all doors, every night. Some stalkers don’t need social media to find you; they do it the old-fashioned way. Therefore, you must be vigilant even in your safe spaces. Deadbolts weren’t created because they look pretty. They were made to keep you from inspiring your own episode of Criminal Minds. If you leave your doors unlocked, there’s no forced entry and law enforcement will waste half an episode interrogating someone you know rather than looking at the creepers you waved to at Target. That’s valuable time you don’t want to spend praying someone finds you tied up in a basement somewhere!

6. Avoid public barbecues or cafeterias. This is less about being murdered and more just a cautionary tale that public cookouts are more than likely serving human meat and cafeteria food is probably poisoned by a disgruntled government employee wanting to cause anarchy. The poison will almost certainly make you bleed from your eyeballs or melt your intestines. It will not be fun. Just pack your own lunch. It’s better for you anyway and you need to stay fit in case you need to outrun a psychopath.

Criminal Minds airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on CBS.

(Full disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS.)

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6 Tips Criminal Minds Taught Me to Avoid Being Murdered – TV Guide

Criminal Minds is not for the faint of heart. The crime procedural is in the middle of its 14th season of reminding viewers everyone they have ever met is a potential unsub. It could be your neighbor, your accountant who is secretly planning revenge for the abuse he suffered from his mother as a child, the rejected nerd who serves you coffee every Thursday at your favorite cafe or just some random guy who saw you on the street and thinks you remind him of an ex who wronged him.

While almost every episode begins with a murder, the BAU has a pretty good track record of finding the victims who get actual dialogue before they are cut up into pieces. I’ve logged a lot of hours watching this show trying to figure out how Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler), Garcia (Kirsten Vangsness) and the rest of BAU solve the horrendous cases they are assigned. It’s entertaining watching them save the day, but Criminal Minds has also hammered home some key tips for how to avoid being captured by an unsub. You could pick the same thing up by catching a marathon on Ion or A&E, or you can check out the tips I’ve compiled here. They will probably save your life. You’re welcome.

<img src="https://cimg.tvgcdn.net/i/2018/11/14/09a5ee10-a2ac-47d5-b624-68cd10a68c59/181113-criminal-minds-matthew-gray-gubler.jpg" class="article-attached-image-img" alt="Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds” width=”2070″ height=”1380″ title=”Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds​”>Matthew Gray Gubler, Criminal Minds

1. Parking lots are death traps, avoid them at all costs. If you’re in the mood for being kidnapped, by all means, head to a parking lot, particularly an enclosed one while you’re alone and babbling away on your cell phone. Women, alone in the dark, are nothing but targets for unsubs, and parking lots make it SO easy for you to be grabbed and shoved in the back of a van to disappear into the night. Seriously, so many second or third victims have been taken this way on Criminal Minds it is insane. If you can’t have a buddy walk with you to your car, do not be on your phone or listen to your iPod because you need your senses about you and a small can of Mace at the ready.

Discover your new favorite show: Watch This Now!

2. Don’t jog in the woods by yourself. Woods/canyons/trails are the second most popular place to be abducted or to have your body ditched after you’ve been gruesomely murdered. Countless bodies have been found by the BAU team by unsuspecting outdoor fitness enthusiasts or their off-the-leash dogs. Jog at the gym or at the park in the middle of the day with lots of people around. Actually, think of timing your jog like timing a swim at the beach. Unsubs hunt for victims the same way sharks hunt for food — at dawn and dusk. Don’t be shark food, especially for a jog.

(via)

3. Learn Morse code. It might seem like a nonsensical art from the past, but it turns out Morse code is extremely useful. If you ignore the first two tips, there’s still a good chance that your unsub will take you by a security camera. That is a great time to tap out a Morse code message for the investigators so they know where you are or where the unsub might be taking you. Any way that you can communicate without giving away that you’re calling for help is going to help law enforcement find you before your unsub takes you out. This most recently helped Reid survive being kidnapped by a serial killer cult, so it can help you too.

4. Turn off location settings on your social media networks. Avoiding running trails and parking lots means nothing if you’re just going to advertise where your stalker can find you. Do you know how easy it is to follow you to your favorite frozen yogurt place when you take selfies of every delicious treat you get there? You should assume that a creep is checking every post and make it at least a little more difficult to figure out your regular routine. If he doesn’t know where you are, he can’t find you alone and murder you. Don’t make Garcia judge you for your ignorance.

The Ultimate Criminal Minds Quiz

5. Lock all doors, every night. Some stalkers don’t need social media to find you; they do it the old-fashioned way. Therefore, you must be vigilant even in your safe spaces. Deadbolts weren’t created because they look pretty. They were made to keep you from inspiring your own episode of Criminal Minds. If you leave your doors unlocked, there’s no forced entry and law enforcement will waste half an episode interrogating someone you know rather than looking at the creepers you waved to at Target. That’s valuable time you don’t want to spend praying someone finds you tied up in a basement somewhere!

6. Avoid public barbecues or cafeterias. This is less about being murdered and more just a cautionary tale that public cookouts are more than likely serving human meat and cafeteria food is probably poisoned by a disgruntled government employee wanting to cause anarchy. The poison will almost certainly make you bleed from your eyeballs or melt your intestines. It will not be fun. Just pack your own lunch. It’s better for you anyway and you need to stay fit in case you need to outrun a psychopath.

Criminal Minds airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on CBS.

(Full disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS.)

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Scoop: Coming Up on a New Episode of CRIMINAL MINDS, on CBS – Wednesday, December 5, 2018 – Broadway World

Scoop: Coming Up on a New Episode of CRIMINAL MINDS, on CBS - Wednesday, December 5, 2018

“Broken Wing” – A professor from Lewis’ past tips off the BAU to an alarming number of overdose deaths of patients who just completed rehab, on CRIMINAL MINDS, Wednesday, Dec. 5 (10:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. Series star Aisha Tyler directed the episode.

CRIMINAL MINDS revolves around an elite team of FBI profilers who analyze the country’s most twisted criminal minds, anticipating their next moves before they strike again. The Behavioral Analysis Unit’s most experienced agent is David Rossi, founding member of the BAU, who is essential in helping the team solve new cases. Other members include Special Agent Emily Prentiss, the daughter of high-powered diplomats who returns to the team after being the head profiler at Interpol; Special Agent Dr. Spencer Reid, a classically misunderstood genius whose social IQ is as low as his intellectual IQ is high; Jennifer “J.J.” Jareau, the team’s former unit liaison turned profiler, who juggles motherhood and marriage with the same skill as she solves cases; Penelope Garcia, the team’s indispensable computer wizard who helps research the cases with her unique charm; Dr. Tara Lewis, a forensic psychologist whose expertise is studying and interviewing serial killers after they’ve been captured to determine if they are able to stand trial; Luke Alvez, a former Army ranger and excellent tracker recruited to the BAU from the FBI’s Fugitive Task Force; and Special Agent Simmons who joins his colleagues in the BAU after consulting them when he was a member of the International Response Team. Simmons is an ex-Delta soldier with deft profiling skills and military special-ops expertise. As the team evolves together, the BAU continues its dedication to using their expertise to pinpoint predators’ motivations and identify their emotional triggers in the attempt to stop them.

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What Is the Net Worth of the 'Criminal Minds' Cast? – The Cheat Sheet

Criminal Minds is one of the longest-running dramas currently on TV. The show – about a group of investigators with the FBI’s behavioral science unit who hunt down serial killers and other criminals – has been on the air since 2005 and is now in its 14th season.

That’s a pretty impressive run for the series, though there are rumors that this might be the show’s last season. If CBS does decide to cancel Criminal Minds, the cast members would at least walk away with full bank accounts. Here’s how much the current cast of Criminal Minds is worth.

Joe Mantegna net worth

Kirsten Vangsness (L) and Joe Mantegna

Kirsten Vangsness (L) and Joe Mantegna Kirsten Vangsness and Joe Mantegna of Criminal Minds. | Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Joe Mantegna, who plays Special Agent David Rossi, joined the Criminal Minds cast in Season 3. He’s been acting since the late 1960s and over the years has accumulated a new worth of $18 million. He recently bought a home in the Hollywood Hills for $1.28 million, Variety reported. 

Paget Brewster net worth

Paget Brewster is worth an estimated $9 million. She first appeared on Criminal Minds in Season 2. While Brewster left the after Season 7, she made occasional guest appearance and returned for good in Season 12.

Matthew Gray Gubler net worth

Matthew Gray Gubler has starred as Dr. Spencer Reid since Criminal Minds premiered in 2005. He’s worth an estimated $10 million. As of 2012, Deadline reported that he was earning more than $100,000 per episode.

A.J. Cook net worth

Another long-time cast member, A.J. Cook plays Special Agent Jennifer Jareau and has an estimated net worth of $4 million. We’re not sure exactly how much she gets paid, but we do know that it’s probably at least $100,000 an episode. That’s because Cook and her co-star Kirsten Vangsness recently negotiated raises to ensure that they were earning as much as their male co-stars like Gubler.

Kirsten Vangsness net worth

Kirsten Vangsness is best known for playing Penelope Garcia on Criminal Minds. She’s also written several episodes of the show. The 46-year-old actress has an estimated net worth of $3 million.

Aisha Tyler net worth

Aisha Tyler

Aisha Tyler Criminal Minds actress Aisha Tyler|  Craig Barritt/Getty Images for New York Comic Con

Aisha Tyler first appeared on Criminal Minds in Season 11 and became a regular cast member in Season 12. She plays Dr. Tara Lewis and is also the voice of Agent Lana Kane on Archer. Previously, she had roles on shows like Ghost Whisperer, CSI, and 24. Tyler is worth an estimated $8 million.

Adam Rodriguez net worth

Adam Rodriguez joined the Criminal Minds cast in Season 12 as Agent Luke Alvez. Previously, he played Erik Delko on CSI: Miami for 10 years and also had recurring roles on Empire, Jane the Virgin, and The Night Shift. His net worth is $16 million.

Daniel Henney net worth

After making several guest appearances on Criminal Minds, David Tenney joined the show as a regular cast member in Season 13, playing Agent Matt Simmons. He also played the same character on the short-lived spin-off show Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders. A former model, Henney has also starred in several popular Korean TV dramas. He has a net worth of $5 million.

All net worth estimates from Celebrity Net Worth.

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Criminal Minds season 15: Cast, air date, episodes and everything you need to know – DigitalSpy.com

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Criminal Minds

When Criminals Minds premiered its 14th season at the beginning of October, the crime drama hit the 300-episode mark, which, we can all agree, is mightily impressive.

But are there any plans to renew the series for a 15th season?

CBS has yet to announce what’s next for the show’s crack team of FBI profilers, but here’s everything we know so far.

Criminal Minds season 15 cast: Who’s coming back?

Season 14 welcomed back all of the main cast, but it’s not known whether they will return for another round of investigations.

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CBS took its sweet time renewing the series following that season 13 cliffhanger, which saw Garcia and Reid at the mercy of a serial killer cult.

That delay, according to show writer Erica Messer, was all down to the network, potentially a worrying sign for the future of the show.

“Sometimes there are a lot of actors who are up for renegotiation,” she told Cinema Blend.

“Sometimes there are issues between ABC and CBS studios as partners in the production of the show.

“This time we have our actors ready to go and our producers and writers are all lined up. I’m sure CBS has many reasons why they are holding back on a pickup. It’s business.”

AJ Cook, Jennifer Jareau, Criminal Minds

New deals would ultimately have to be made with numerous members of the main cast, which includes Joe Mantegna as David Rossi, Matthew Gray Gubler as Dr Spencer Reid, AJ Cook as Jennifer “JJ” Jareau, Kirsten Vangsness as Penelope Garcia, Aisha Tyler as Dr Tara Lewis, Daniel Henney as Matt Simmons, Adam Rodriguez as Luke Alvez, and Paget Brewster as Emily Prentiss.

Thomas Gibson was a cast regular as Aaron Hotchner and first appeared on the show when it debuted back in 2005, but he lost his job in 2016 after allegedly kicking a producer in the shins.

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After being sent home for two weeks, he was eventually “dismissed” from the show.

Criminal Minds season 15 air date: When can we expect it?

According to CBS Entertainment president Kelly Kahl, a decision has not yet been made on the future of the show.

“I’m not saying this is the last season,” he told Deadline.

“We will have an honest discussion with them at the right time.”

Paget Brewster & AJ Cook in Criminal Minds

There have been numerous reports indicating that CBS doesn’t want to keep going with the show because the ratings don’t match the production costs, TV Line reporting that season 14 opened with a series low.

But if it is given the thumbs up, we would expect to find out in spring 2019 (the previous three seasons were either renewed in April or May), with an air date towards the end of the year.

Criminal Minds season 15 episodes: How many will there be?

Season 14 has a shorter running time with just 15 episodes, which might sound like a lot, but all of the other seasons have had significantly more, the fewest being 20 and the most 26.

“As scheduling evolves and we try to get more original episodes on air, we have to cut and paste and sometimes trim episodes on some of those shows to get more originals on the air,” Kahl told Deadline.

Joe Mantegna as Rossi in 'Criminal Minds'

Fans of the show were concerned that all signs were pointing to non-renewal, but Kahl didn’t rule out the possibility of an extension: “They possibly can get a couple of more episodes. It depends where they are in production, they will let us know.”

Criminal Minds season 15 trailer: When can we see it?

With season 15 still up in the air, don’t expect a trailer any time soon.

But what we can say with absolute certainty is that fans should expect a lot more of the same.


Want up-to-the-minute entertainment and tech news? Just hit ‘Like’ on our Digital Spy Facebook page and ‘Follow’ on our @digitalspy Twitter account and you’re all set.

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Criminal profiling doesn't work. TV shows should maybe stop celebrating it. – Vox

I watch a lot of crime shows and listen to a lot of true crime podcasts, so naturally I’ve spent a lot of time with charismatic FBI profiler characters.

It’s really hard to overstate how much this character archetype has penetrated pop culture. Just one profiler, John Douglas, is reportedly the basis for at least four fictional characters: Jack Crawford from the Hannibal novels/movies/TV show; both the Mandy Patinkin and Joe Mantegna characters on Criminal Minds; and Mindhunter’s Holden Ford (played by Jonathan Groff). Manhunt: Unabomber focuses on Jim Fitzgerald (played by Sam Worthington and based on the profiler of the same real name).

TNT’s The Alienist, which I still need to see, features a psychological profiler working in 1896 in New York City. We hardly knew anything about human psychology in 1896!

And the trouble is, while we know a lot more now, we don’t know enough. It’s a real, honest-to-God bummer, but criminal profiling doesn’t appear to work. At all. Even if it did, it’d be a misallocation of intellectual energy.

Malcolm Gladwell made this case in his trademark narrative, somewhat elliptical way back in 2007 (I don’t mean that as a dig, it’s a great piece and informed a lot of this post, but it’s also long and New Yorker-y). The research literature is genuinely strange. The consensus is that profiling isn’t very effective, and even profiling-sympathetic people are reduced to arguing that criminal profiles by the professionals are marginally more accurate than ones written by completely untrained people off the street.

And here’s the thing: They’re not much better than random people off the street! A 2007 meta analysis by criminologists Brent Snook, Joseph Eastwood, Paul Gendreau, Claire Goggin, and Richard Cullen compared four studies where self-described criminal profilers were tasked with analyzing crime scene data and coming up with a profile, and compared their predictions to other groups like normal detectives or students.

They find that profilers do only slightly better than random people at predicting traits of offenders. “We contend that, in any field, an ‘expert’ should decisively outperform nonexperts (ie lay persons),” the authors write. They didn’t find that. They conclude that profiling is a “pseudoscientific technique,” of limited if any value to investigators.

A group of researchers at the University of Liverpool with the psychologist Laurence Alison have taken a different approach by evaluating the central assumption of profiling: that characteristics of a crime and crime scene can predict useful traits about a criminal. In a bracingly blunt 2002 journal article called “Is offender profiling possible?” Alison and his co-author Andreas Mokros conclude, basically, “No.”

They looked at 100 British rapists: all men, all targeting women 16 and older, and all rapists who attacked strangers rather than acquaintances or significant others. Were people who committed crimes similarly, with similar modi operandi, likely to be similar demographically, too? Nope, not at all. “Neither age, socio-demographic features nor previous convictions established any links with offence behaviour,” Mateas and Alison concluded.

In other words, the central assumption of criminal profiling is nonsense. You can’t look at a crime scene and conclude stuff like, “The offender is a 25- to 34-year-old white man who dropped out of high school.”

But criminal profiling also has an opportunity cost: There are a lot of really hard problems in the world that progress in psychology would help address, and from which criminal profiling might be a distraction.

Mental health struggles are an obvious example, but there are less obvious ones too, like getting better at predictions. Philip Tetlock at the University of Pennsylvania has been, for decades, studying how experts and laypeople make predictions about future events, and holding tournaments to isolate the factors that lead to good, accurate forecasts.

The social consequences of being able to forecast the future better are immense. “If we could improve the judgement of government officials facing high-stakes decisions — reducing their susceptibility to various biases, or developing better methods of aggregating expertise — this could have positive knock-on effects across a huge range of domains,” Jess Whittlestone notes. “For example, it could just as well improve our ability to avert threats like a nuclear crisis, as help us allocate scarce resources towards the most effective interventions in education and healthcare.”

This is even clearer if you look to the past. If the European powers had been able to foresee an intractable bloody stalemate as the consequence of joining Austria’s war against Serbia in 1914, they almost certainly wouldn’t have jumped in as enthusiastically; maybe Austria would’ve restrained itself, too. If investment banks had more accurate forecasting models of the mortgage market in the mid-2000s, or knew enough to listen to accurate models that housing bubble bears were making, perhaps the financial crisis could’ve been averted. World War I and the mortgage crisis were huge, complicated events, but they were also, in part, forecasting errors.

So imagine you’re a psychology Ph.D. student and, instead of working on that, or instead of trying to advance our understanding of what causes schizophrenia or major depression, you decide you want to catch serial killers using the power of your mind. Does that really feel like the highest use of your talents? Few psychologists, to be fair, do this now; most go into clinical practice or do basic research as academics. But we’ve allocated a weird amount of cultural capital to this especially pointless subset of the discipline.

In Alec Wilkinson’s profile of Thomas Hargrove, a remarkable data journalist who has built an algorithm that can help identify serial killers based on similar locations, MOs, etc., Wilkinson notes that the FBI thinks less than 1 percent of annual homicides are by serial killers. Hargrove thinks it’s higher. But there were 19,362 homicides in 2016. Even if 2 percent of those people were killed by serial killers, that’s 387 people a year.

By comparison, about 480,000 to 540,000 people die in the US every year due to cigarettes, about 88,000 due to alcohol, and between 3,000 and 49,000 due to the flu. Closer to the world of psychiatry, more than 40,000 Americans die annually from suicide; given that we know severe mental illness increases non-suicide mortality too, the true death toll of depression and other mood disorders is significantly higher.

Maybe increasing clearance rates for serial killers is more tractable, an easier lift than bringing those numbers down. But I have my doubts. And that’s just thinking about the US. If distributing bednets through the Against Malaria Foundation saves a life for every $3,687 spent (a rough number to be sure), and 2 percent of US murders are from serial killers, then for only $1.4 million a year you can save as many lives with bednets in Africa as you would from ending serial-killing in the US entirely. It’s impossible to imagine ending serial killing for only $1.4 million a year.

I don’t mean this as a knock on Hargrove personally. Spending all day catching serial killers sounds absolutely awesome, and it’s cool as hell to do it with big data — and more to the point, even if it’s not the biggest problem in the world, it’s big enough that having one really smart person working full-time on it probably makes sense.

I just wish all the super brilliant, talented scientists and FBI agents from my favorite shows would move to Philadelphia and help Philip Tetlock forecast world events, rather than hanging out in Quantico and trying to catch Hannibal Lecter.


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Criminal Minds Sneak Peek: Alves Goes Full-On Tom Cruise to Catch the Bad Guy – TV Guide

Criminal Minds is taking a break from turning your stomaches with their terrifying unsubs and giving you a full-on adrenaline rush with this week’s episode, “Luke.”

As you can probably guess, Luke Alvez (Adam Rodriguez) is at the center of this week’s caper and it’s an action-packed adventure. The team gets called to Bethesda, Md. after a string of people are killed in a rapid fashion. It turns out that a hitman Alvez previously investigated five years ago is back in action, which makes Alvez the top person to take him down.

Discover your new favorite show: Watch This Now!

TV Guide has an exclusive sneak peek of the episode which shows Alvez in a flashback chasing down his target Tom Cruise style, confident he can catch this guy before a sniper on the roof takes him out. It’s a heart-pounding clip as Alvez races through the streets and finally tackles his mark and the sniper loses his shot. But is this the same guy that the BAU team is chasing down in the present? And if it is, does Alvez regret not letting the sniper take the shot, considering so many more people are now dead?

The answers will be revealed in the Alvez-centric episode that airs Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 10/9c on CBS.

(Full Disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS.)

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Criminal Minds Season 14 Episode 6 Luke Sneak Peek: Alvez Goes … – TV Guide

Criminal Minds is taking a break from turning your stomaches with their terrifying unsubs and giving you a full-on adrenaline rush with this week’s episode, “Luke.”

As you can probably guess, Luke Alvez (Adam Rodriguez) is at the center of this week’s caper and it’s an action-packed adventure. The team gets called to Bethesda, Md. after a string of people are killed in a rapid fashion. It turns out that a hitman Alvez previously investigated five years ago is back in action, which makes Alvez the top person to take him down.

Discover your new favorite show: Watch This Now!

TV Guide has an exclusive sneak peek of the episode which shows Alvez in a flashback chasing down his target Tom Cruise style, confident he can catch this guy before a sniper on the roof takes him out. It’s a heart-pounding clip as Alvez races through the streets and finally tackles his mark and the sniper loses his shot. But is this the same guy that the BAU team is chasing down in the present? And if it is, does Alvez regret not letting the sniper take the shot, considering so many more people are now dead?

The answers will be revealed in the Alvez-centric episode that airs Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 10/9c on CBS.

(Full Disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS.)

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Twitter suggested CBS' Criminal Minds to many…who follow ESPN's Rachel Nichols, who is not the actress who was … – Awful Announcing

The Twitter algorithms sometimes produce some strange suggestions, and one Wednesday night was particularly noticed by the sports audience. Browsing through the search tab on the mobile Twitter app led to a lot of people getting “Criminal Minds airing on CBS” promoted to them, but with an extremely odd reason (as seen above): “Because you follow Rachel Nichols.” Nichols, host of ESPN’s daily NBA show The Jump, does not appear on Criminal Minds, does not work for CBS, and does not appear to have ever tweeted about the show. But it turns out that there’s another Rachel Nichols, an actress most recently seen in Taken (the NBC series) and The Librarians (the TNT series), and she was on Criminal Minds in 2010-11 before being dropped. Here’s a look at the two of them, with ESPN’s Nichols on the left and actress Nichols (during her Criminal Minds stint) on the right:

Rachel Nichols squared.

Why Twitter would try to promote Criminal Minds with an actress who hasn’t been on it since 2011 is a good question in its own right, but it seems like something in their algorithm must have correlated “Rachel Nichols” to “Criminal Minds” and then picked the ESPN host (Twitter handle @Rachel__Nichols, 1.01 million followers) instead of the actress (Twitter handle @RachelNichols1, 74,200 followers). And this affected a whole lot of people, many of whom tweeted at Nichols, leading to her sending this response:

Fellow ESPN host Nolan had a pretty good response:

Here are some of the other tweets, showing how widespread this was:

Anyway, ESPN’s Rachel Nichols is not the actress Rachel Nichols, no matter how much Twitter tries to tell you so. (And this isn’t their first shenanigans around Criminal Minds; the show has previously shown up in the search column with “Because you follow Criminal Minds,” even to people who don’t follow the official account, and it’s shown up at the top of other Twitter areas (as seen in Nolan’s photo above.) But hey, maybe they can get ESPN’s Rachel Nichols to guest star at some point. If Stephen A. Smith can have a recurring role on General Hospital, anything is possible.

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'Criminal Minds': Alvez Goes Rogue in Wednesday Night's Episode – PopCulture.com

A preview for this week’s episode of Criminal Minds shows some serious drama within the Behavioral Analysis Unit.

This week the B.A.U. is going to Bethesda, Maryland to investigate a string of four murders. According to the synopsis, things get personal for Alvez, as the crimes are tied to a killer he hunted during his years working with the D.E.A. and Mexican police. Luke Alvez (Adam Rodriguez) helped the two agencies go after a notorious Mexican hit man in the past, and now emotions are running high as he revisits that history.

Meanwhile, Alvez is moving in with his girlfriend Lisa — played by Daniella Alonso — making things that much more high-stakes for him. By the looks of the preview, all this may come to a grinding halt as Alvez finds himself at gunpoint — and not necessarily from an enemy. In the video, Emily Prentiss (Padget Brewster) appears furious with Alvez.

“You defied a direct order,” she says dangerously.

Given that the episode seems to be named after him, it looks like this will be a big week for Alvez. Another sneak peek was published by TV Guide, showing a flashback for the agent where he chases the suspected killer through the streets.

By the looks of it, in the past Alvez tackled the killer, causing a sniper to lose their potential shot at him. This means that for him, these new deaths are at least partially his responsibility. Alvez will have to try and maintain his judgement as the responsibility begins to weigh on him.

This is Rodriguez’s third season playing Alvez on Criminal Minds. Alvez is a member of the FBI Fugitive Task Force, who partnered with the BAU to help catch serial killers that had escaped from prison in the previous season’s finale. After a few storylines, Alvez joined up with the BAu full time.

Alvez is a veteran who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan as an Army Ranger before he was hired by the FBI. He carries a lot of trauma, mainly from the loss of his previous partner at the hands of a grisly serial killer. He has a reputation for being hot-headed and emotional, and this week it looks like that could land him in hot water.

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Criminal Minds is now five episodes into its 14th season and it is going strong. The show is holding onto a consist audience of around 4.4 million total viewers per week.

This episode airs on Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 10 p.m. ET only on CBS.

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